Workplace social capital and all-cause mortality: A prospective cohort study of 28043 public-sector employees in Finland

Tuula Oksanen, Mika Kivimäki, Ichiro Kawachi, S. V. Subramanian, Soshi Takao, Etsuji Suzuki, Anne Kouvonen, Jaana Pentti, Paula Salo, Marianna Virtanen, Jussi Vahtera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We examined the association between workplace social capital and all-cause mortality in a large occupational cohort from Finland. Methods: We linked responses of 28043 participants to surveys in 2000 to 2002 and in 2004 to national mortality registers through 2009. We used repeated measurements of self- and coworker-assessed social capital. We carried out Cox proportional hazard and fixed-effects logistic regressions. Results: During the 5-year follow-up, 196 employees died. A 1-unit increase in the mean of repeat measurements of self-assessed workplace social capital (range 1-5) was associated with a 19% decrease in the risk of all-cause mortality (age- and gender-adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.66, 0.99). The corresponding point estimate for the mean of coworker-assessed social capital was similar, although the association was less precisely estimated (age- and gender-adjusted HR=0.77; 95% CI=0.50, 1.20). In fixed-effects analysis, a 1-unit increase in self-assessed social capital across the 2 time points was associated with a lower mortality risk (odds ratio=0.81; 95% CI=0.55, 1.19). Conclusions: Workplace social capital appears to be associated with lowered mortality in the working-aged population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1742-1748
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume101
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2011

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Public Sector
Finland
Workplace
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Mortality
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Social Capital
Logistic Models
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Workplace social capital and all-cause mortality : A prospective cohort study of 28043 public-sector employees in Finland. / Oksanen, Tuula; Kivimäki, Mika; Kawachi, Ichiro; Subramanian, S. V.; Takao, Soshi; Suzuki, Etsuji; Kouvonen, Anne; Pentti, Jaana; Salo, Paula; Virtanen, Marianna; Vahtera, Jussi.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 101, No. 9, 01.09.2011, p. 1742-1748.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oksanen, T, Kivimäki, M, Kawachi, I, Subramanian, SV, Takao, S, Suzuki, E, Kouvonen, A, Pentti, J, Salo, P, Virtanen, M & Vahtera, J 2011, 'Workplace social capital and all-cause mortality: A prospective cohort study of 28043 public-sector employees in Finland', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 101, no. 9, pp. 1742-1748. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2011.300166
Oksanen, Tuula ; Kivimäki, Mika ; Kawachi, Ichiro ; Subramanian, S. V. ; Takao, Soshi ; Suzuki, Etsuji ; Kouvonen, Anne ; Pentti, Jaana ; Salo, Paula ; Virtanen, Marianna ; Vahtera, Jussi. / Workplace social capital and all-cause mortality : A prospective cohort study of 28043 public-sector employees in Finland. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2011 ; Vol. 101, No. 9. pp. 1742-1748.
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