Work-based social networks and health status among Japanese employees

Etsuji Suzuki, Soshi Takao, S. V. Subramanian, Hiroyuki Doi, I. Kawachi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite the worldwide trend towards more time being spent at work by employed people, few studies have examined the independent influences of work-based versus home-based social networks on employees' health. We examined the association between work-based social networks and health status by controlling for home-based social networks in a cross-sectional study. Methods: By employing a two-stage stratified random sampling procedure, 1105 employees were identified from 46 companies in Okayama, Japan, in 2007. Work-based social networks were assessed by asking the number of co-workers whom they consult with ease on personal issues. The outcome was self-rated health; the adjusted OR for poor health compared employees with no network with those who have larger networks. Results: Although a clear (and inverse) dose-response relationship was found between the size of work-based social networks and poor health (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.03 to 2.27, comparing those with the lowest versus highest level of social network), the association was attenuated to statistical non-significance after we controlled for the size of home-based social networks. In further analyses stratified on age groups, in older workers (≥50 years) work-based social networks were apparently associated with better health status, whereas home-based networks were not. The reverse was true among middle-aged workers (30-49 years). No associations were found among younger workers (

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)692-696
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Volume63
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009

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Social Support
Health Status
Occupational Health
Health
Japan
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

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Work-based social networks and health status among Japanese employees. / Suzuki, Etsuji; Takao, Soshi; Subramanian, S. V.; Doi, Hiroyuki; Kawachi, I.

In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Vol. 63, No. 9, 09.2009, p. 692-696.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suzuki, Etsuji ; Takao, Soshi ; Subramanian, S. V. ; Doi, Hiroyuki ; Kawachi, I. / Work-based social networks and health status among Japanese employees. In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. 2009 ; Vol. 63, No. 9. pp. 692-696.
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