Viruses of Plant-Interacting Fungi

Bradley I. Hillman, Aulia Annisa, Nobuhiro Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plant-associated fungi are infected by viruses at the incidence rates from a few % to over 90%. Multiple viruses often coinfect fungal hosts, and occasionally alter their phenotypes, but most of the infections are asymptomatic. Phenotypic alterations are grouped into two types: harmful or beneficial to the host fungi. Harmful interactions between viruses and hosts include hypovirulence and/or debilitation that are documented in a number of phytopathogenic fungi, exemplified by the chestnut blight, white root rot, and rapeseed rot fungi. Beneficial interactions are observed in a limited number of plant endophytic and pathogenic fungi where heat tolerance and virulence are enhanced, respectively. Coinfections of fungi provided a platform for discoveries of interesting virus/virus interactions that include synergistic, as in the case for those in plants, and unique antagonistic and mutualistic interactions between unrelated RNA viruses. Also discussed here are coinfection-induced genome rearrangements and frequently observed coinfections by the simplest positive-strand RNA virus, the mitoviruses.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAdvances in Virus Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Plant Viruses
Fungi
Viruses
Coinfection
RNA Viruses
Brassica rapa
Asymptomatic Infections
Virulence
Genome
Phenotype
Incidence

Keywords

  • Fungal virus
  • Mitovirus
  • Mycovirus
  • RNA silencing
  • Virus/host interactions
  • Virus/virus interactions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Viruses of Plant-Interacting Fungi. / Hillman, Bradley I.; Annisa, Aulia; Suzuki, Nobuhiro.

In: Advances in Virus Research, 01.01.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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