Viruses of Plant-Interacting Fungi

Bradley I. Hillman, Aulia Annisa, Nobuhiro Suzuki

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    43 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Plant-associated fungi are infected by viruses at the incidence rates from a few % to over 90%. Multiple viruses often coinfect fungal hosts, and occasionally alter their phenotypes, but most of the infections are asymptomatic. Phenotypic alterations are grouped into two types: harmful or beneficial to the host fungi. Harmful interactions between viruses and hosts include hypovirulence and/or debilitation that are documented in a number of phytopathogenic fungi, exemplified by the chestnut blight, white root rot, and rapeseed rot fungi. Beneficial interactions are observed in a limited number of plant endophytic and pathogenic fungi where heat tolerance and virulence are enhanced, respectively. Coinfections of fungi provided a platform for discoveries of interesting virus/virus interactions that include synergistic, as in the case for those in plants, and unique antagonistic and mutualistic interactions between unrelated RNA viruses. Also discussed here are coinfection-induced genome rearrangements and frequently observed coinfections by the simplest positive-strand RNA virus, the mitoviruses.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAdvances in Virus Research
    EditorsMargaret Kielian, Thomas C. Mettenleiter, Marilyn J. Roossinck
    PublisherAcademic Press Inc.
    Pages99-116
    Number of pages18
    ISBN (Print)9780128152010
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

    Publication series

    NameAdvances in Virus Research
    Volume100
    ISSN (Print)0065-3527
    ISSN (Electronic)1557-8399

    Keywords

    • Fungal virus
    • Mitovirus
    • Mycovirus
    • RNA silencing
    • Virus/host interactions
    • Virus/virus interactions

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Virology
    • Infectious Diseases

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