Variations in bacterial communities in laboratory-scale and big bale silos assessed by fermentation products, colony counts and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiles

N. Naoki, T. Yuji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To assess the variation in bacterial communities in laboratory-scale and big bale silos. Methods and Results: Wilted Italian ryegrass (628 g dry matter kg-1) was ensiled in vacuum-packed plastic pouches and big bales. Silos were opened after 3 months, and the fermentation products, colony counts and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles were determined. Eight samples were collected separately from a big bale, while one representative sample was taken from a plastic pouch. Significant variation was found between big bales in dry matter, ethanol, lactic acid, acetic acid and ammonia-N contents. No differences were shown between plastic pouches and big bales, except that more ethanol was produced in the former air-tight silos. Plastic pouches could resemble a specific silo and outer sampling sites of big bales based on fermentation products and DGGE profiles respectively. Conclusions: Considerable variation in fermentation products may exist between big bale silos. Plastic pouches can serve as a model of big bale silos, although they do not provide information on the heterogeneity within and between bales. Significance and Impact of the Study: Assessment of bacterial communities associated with ensiling can differ according to the criteria of fermentation products, colony counts and DGGE profiles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-288
Number of pages6
JournalLetters in Applied Microbiology
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

Keywords

  • Big bale
  • Cluster analysis
  • Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis
  • Silage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

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