Validation of the optimal site in the neck region for detecting swallowing sounds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recently, the swallowing sound has been used to detect swallowing events non-invasively. A previous study, using an accelerometer, showed that the site over the lateral border of the trachea immediately inferior to the cricoid cartilage was the optimal site for detecting swallowing sounds. However, the optimal site for detection of the swallowing sound using a microphone remains undetermined. To validate the optimal site in the neck region for detecting swallowing sounds. Fourteen healthy subjects (mean age, 27·6 ± 2·2 years; seven male and seven female) participated in this study. Twenty condenser microphones were attached to 20 sites on the left neck surface to detect swallowing sounds. Participants were instructed to swallow five different stimuli three times as follows: Resting saliva, 1 and 5 mL of Japanese tea, and 1 and 5 mL of yoghurt. Mean relative peak intensity was used to indicate the magnitude of the swallowing sound. Sound spectrograms were used to illustrate differences in the properties of swallowing sounds. Mean relative peak intensity number was highest in sites at the inferior border of the mandible just above the sternocleidomastoid muscle (site 11) and sites over the lateral border of the trachea immediately inferior to the cricoid cartilage (site 8). Comparison of spectrograms showed a greater density distribution of higher frequency components at site 11 compared with site 8. These results indicate that the inferior border of the mandible just above the sternocleidomastoid muscle is the optimal site for the detection of swallowing sounds.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)840-846
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Oral Rehabilitation
Volume43
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

Deglutition
Neck
Cricoid Cartilage
Trachea
Mandible
Muscles
Yogurt
Tea
Saliva
Healthy Volunteers

Keywords

  • acoustics
  • deglutition
  • neck
  • non-invasive
  • sound
  • swallowing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

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title = "Validation of the optimal site in the neck region for detecting swallowing sounds",
abstract = "Recently, the swallowing sound has been used to detect swallowing events non-invasively. A previous study, using an accelerometer, showed that the site over the lateral border of the trachea immediately inferior to the cricoid cartilage was the optimal site for detecting swallowing sounds. However, the optimal site for detection of the swallowing sound using a microphone remains undetermined. To validate the optimal site in the neck region for detecting swallowing sounds. Fourteen healthy subjects (mean age, 27·6 ± 2·2 years; seven male and seven female) participated in this study. Twenty condenser microphones were attached to 20 sites on the left neck surface to detect swallowing sounds. Participants were instructed to swallow five different stimuli three times as follows: Resting saliva, 1 and 5 mL of Japanese tea, and 1 and 5 mL of yoghurt. Mean relative peak intensity was used to indicate the magnitude of the swallowing sound. Sound spectrograms were used to illustrate differences in the properties of swallowing sounds. Mean relative peak intensity number was highest in sites at the inferior border of the mandible just above the sternocleidomastoid muscle (site 11) and sites over the lateral border of the trachea immediately inferior to the cricoid cartilage (site 8). Comparison of spectrograms showed a greater density distribution of higher frequency components at site 11 compared with site 8. These results indicate that the inferior border of the mandible just above the sternocleidomastoid muscle is the optimal site for the detection of swallowing sounds.",
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AB - Recently, the swallowing sound has been used to detect swallowing events non-invasively. A previous study, using an accelerometer, showed that the site over the lateral border of the trachea immediately inferior to the cricoid cartilage was the optimal site for detecting swallowing sounds. However, the optimal site for detection of the swallowing sound using a microphone remains undetermined. To validate the optimal site in the neck region for detecting swallowing sounds. Fourteen healthy subjects (mean age, 27·6 ± 2·2 years; seven male and seven female) participated in this study. Twenty condenser microphones were attached to 20 sites on the left neck surface to detect swallowing sounds. Participants were instructed to swallow five different stimuli three times as follows: Resting saliva, 1 and 5 mL of Japanese tea, and 1 and 5 mL of yoghurt. Mean relative peak intensity was used to indicate the magnitude of the swallowing sound. Sound spectrograms were used to illustrate differences in the properties of swallowing sounds. Mean relative peak intensity number was highest in sites at the inferior border of the mandible just above the sternocleidomastoid muscle (site 11) and sites over the lateral border of the trachea immediately inferior to the cricoid cartilage (site 8). Comparison of spectrograms showed a greater density distribution of higher frequency components at site 11 compared with site 8. These results indicate that the inferior border of the mandible just above the sternocleidomastoid muscle is the optimal site for the detection of swallowing sounds.

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