Utility of the scalp-recorded ictal EEG in childhood epilepsy

Harumi Yoshinaga, Junri Hattori, Hodaka Ohta, Takashi Asano, Tatsuya Ogino, Katsuhiro Kobayashi, Eiji Oka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of the scalp-recorded ictal EEGs in diagnosing childhood epilepsy. Methods: We analyzed the ictal EEGs of 259 seizures in 183 patients who visited the department of child neurology, Okayama University Medical School, during the past 6 years. Results: We divided all seizures into the following four categories, according to the diagnostic usefulness of ictal EEGs in determining the seizure type: 1. (a) Ictal EEGs confirmed the diagnosis of the seizure type based on seizure symptoms (101 seizures); (b) Ictal EEGs aided in the classification of the seizure type based on the seizure symptoms (101 seizures); (c) Ictal EEGs corrected errors in the classification (37 seizures); and (d) Ictal EEGs revealed previously unreported/ undocumented seizure type (20 seizures). 2. Of the 37 misdiagnosed seizures (group C), 11 were nonepileptic seizures misdiagnosed as epileptic seizures, eight were complex partial seizures (CPS) misdiagnosed as the other seizure types, and 10 were other seizure types misdiagnosed as CPSs. 3. Of the 20 previously unreported/undocumented seizures (group D), nine were myoclonic seizures, five were absence seizures, five were CPS, and one was tonic spasms. 4. Seventy-two patients had CPS. Among them, 11 patients showed no epileptic spikes in their interictal EEG recordings. Therefore, ictal recordings confirmed the diagnosis of epilepsy. Conclusions: Ictal EEG recording is a very useful diagnostic tool not only for determining seizure types, but also for uncovering the existence of the unsuspected seizure types. It supplies the physician with useful information for the classification and the treatment of epilepsy. In particular, ictal EEGs are useful in diagnosing patients with CPS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)772-777
Number of pages6
JournalEpilepsia
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Scalp
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy
Seizures
Stroke
Diagnostic Errors
Absence Epilepsy

Keywords

  • Complex partial seizures
  • Epilepsy
  • Ictal EEG
  • Spasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Yoshinaga, H., Hattori, J., Ohta, H., Asano, T., Ogino, T., Kobayashi, K., & Oka, E. (2001). Utility of the scalp-recorded ictal EEG in childhood epilepsy. Epilepsia, 42(6), 772-777. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1528-1157.2001.37100.x

Utility of the scalp-recorded ictal EEG in childhood epilepsy. / Yoshinaga, Harumi; Hattori, Junri; Ohta, Hodaka; Asano, Takashi; Ogino, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Oka, Eiji.

In: Epilepsia, Vol. 42, No. 6, 2001, p. 772-777.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yoshinaga, H, Hattori, J, Ohta, H, Asano, T, Ogino, T, Kobayashi, K & Oka, E 2001, 'Utility of the scalp-recorded ictal EEG in childhood epilepsy', Epilepsia, vol. 42, no. 6, pp. 772-777. https://doi.org/10.1046/j.1528-1157.2001.37100.x
Yoshinaga, Harumi ; Hattori, Junri ; Ohta, Hodaka ; Asano, Takashi ; Ogino, Tatsuya ; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro ; Oka, Eiji. / Utility of the scalp-recorded ictal EEG in childhood epilepsy. In: Epilepsia. 2001 ; Vol. 42, No. 6. pp. 772-777.
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