Usefulness of body surface mapping to differentiate patients with Brugada syndrome from patients with asymptomatic Brugada syndrome

Kenichi Hisamatsu, Kengo Fukushima Kusano, Hiroshi Morita, Shiho Takenaka, Satoshi Nagase, Kazufumi Nakamura, Tetsuro Emori, Hiromi Matsubara, Tohru Ohe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We attempted to determine the usefulness of body surface mapping (BSM) for differentiating patients with Brugada syndrome (BS) from patients with asymptomatic Brugada syndrome (ABS). Electrocardiograms (ECG) and BSM were recorded in 7 patients with BS and 35 patients with ABS. Following the administration of Ic antiarrhythmic drugs, BSM was recorded in 5 patients with BS and 16 patients with ABS. The maximum amplitudes at J0, J20, J40 and J60 were compared between the 2 groups, as were 3-dimensional maps. The maximum amplitudes at J0, J20 and J60 under control conditions were larger in patients with BS than in patients with ABS (P < 0.05). A three-dimensional map of the ST segments under control conditions in patients with BS showed a higher peak of ST elevation in the median precordium compared to that for patients with ABS. Increases in ST elevation at J20, J40 and J60 following drug administration were greater in patients with BS than in patients with ABS (P < 0.05). Evaluation of the change in amplitude of the ST segment at E5 caused by Ic drug administration was also useful for differentiating between the 2 groups. In conclusion, BSM was useful for differentiating patients with BS from those with ABS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-35
Number of pages7
JournalActa medica Okayama
Volume58
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2004

Keywords

  • Asymptomatic brugada syndrome
  • Body surface map
  • Brugada syndrome
  • Ic antiarrhythmic drugs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

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