Trehalose protects corneal epithelial cells from death by drying

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Abstract

Aim - This study was designed to examine whether trehalose could protect corneal epithelial cells in culture from death by desiccation in order to test trehalose as a potential new eye drop for dry eye syndrome. Methods - Human corneal epithelial cells in near confluent culture in wells of a 96 well multidish were preincubated for 15 minutes with 2, 20, 50, 100, or 200 mM trehalose or maltose in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), PBS alone, or three kinds of commercially available artificial tear substitutes (one with borate buffered saline and the other two containing either hydroxyethylcellulose or hyaluronan). The medium was aspirated completely and cells were left dry for 30 minutes at room temperature in room humidity. Live cells and dead cells were visualised by fluorescent dyes and counted for statistical analysis. Results - The percentage of dead corneal epithelial cells after desiccation was significantly lower in preincubation with 50, 100, and 200 mM trehalose, compared with preincubation with PBS alone (p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)610-612
Number of pages3
JournalBritish Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume85
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Trehalose
Cell Death
Epithelial Cells
Desiccation
Phosphates
Dry Eye Syndromes
Borates
Maltose
Ophthalmic Solutions
Hyaluronic Acid
Humidity
Fluorescent Dyes
Cell Culture Techniques
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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Trehalose protects corneal epithelial cells from death by drying. / Matsuo, Toshihiko.

In: British Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 85, No. 5, 2001, p. 610-612.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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