Transplantation of embryonic retinal pigment epithelial cells onto damaged Bruch's membrane in rabbits

C. Shiragami, Fumio Shiraga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose. To investigate the effect of artificially damaged Bruch's membrane on growth and differentiation of embryonic retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells transplanted into subretinal space. Methods. Embryonic RPE cells obtained from pigmented rabbits as a donor were transplanted into the subretinal space of adult albino rabbits as a host. The host RPE was removed with silicone cannula and the Bruch's membrane, was damaged with a microhooked 27-gauge needle under the detached retina in closed vitrectomy. The transplantation sites were examined by light and electron microscopy at 3, 7, and 14 days after the surgery. Results. Transplanted RPE cells were attached to the moderately damaged areas of Bruch's membrane and showed good polarity as apical microvilli and basal infoIdings as well as the formation of tight junctions with host RPE cells 3 days after the surgery. In contrast, fibroblastlike cells with little evidence of their differentiation into RPE cells layered on the extremely damaged areas of Bruch's membrane even at 14 days after the surgery. Conclusion. Embryonic RPE cells could grow and differentiate on the moderately damaged Bruch's membrane, while the extremely damaged Bruch's membrane did not allow them to differentiate although they could grow and cover the damaged areas.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume38
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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Bruch Membrane
Retinal Pigments
Transplantation
Epithelial Cells
Rabbits
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Tight Junctions
Vitrectomy
Silicones
Microvilli
Needles
Retina
Electron Microscopy
Light
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

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title = "Transplantation of embryonic retinal pigment epithelial cells onto damaged Bruch's membrane in rabbits",
abstract = "Purpose. To investigate the effect of artificially damaged Bruch's membrane on growth and differentiation of embryonic retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells transplanted into subretinal space. Methods. Embryonic RPE cells obtained from pigmented rabbits as a donor were transplanted into the subretinal space of adult albino rabbits as a host. The host RPE was removed with silicone cannula and the Bruch's membrane, was damaged with a microhooked 27-gauge needle under the detached retina in closed vitrectomy. The transplantation sites were examined by light and electron microscopy at 3, 7, and 14 days after the surgery. Results. Transplanted RPE cells were attached to the moderately damaged areas of Bruch's membrane and showed good polarity as apical microvilli and basal infoIdings as well as the formation of tight junctions with host RPE cells 3 days after the surgery. In contrast, fibroblastlike cells with little evidence of their differentiation into RPE cells layered on the extremely damaged areas of Bruch's membrane even at 14 days after the surgery. Conclusion. Embryonic RPE cells could grow and differentiate on the moderately damaged Bruch's membrane, while the extremely damaged Bruch's membrane did not allow them to differentiate although they could grow and cover the damaged areas.",
author = "C. Shiragami and Fumio Shiraga",
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T1 - Transplantation of embryonic retinal pigment epithelial cells onto damaged Bruch's membrane in rabbits

AU - Shiragami, C.

AU - Shiraga, Fumio

PY - 1997

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N2 - Purpose. To investigate the effect of artificially damaged Bruch's membrane on growth and differentiation of embryonic retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells transplanted into subretinal space. Methods. Embryonic RPE cells obtained from pigmented rabbits as a donor were transplanted into the subretinal space of adult albino rabbits as a host. The host RPE was removed with silicone cannula and the Bruch's membrane, was damaged with a microhooked 27-gauge needle under the detached retina in closed vitrectomy. The transplantation sites were examined by light and electron microscopy at 3, 7, and 14 days after the surgery. Results. Transplanted RPE cells were attached to the moderately damaged areas of Bruch's membrane and showed good polarity as apical microvilli and basal infoIdings as well as the formation of tight junctions with host RPE cells 3 days after the surgery. In contrast, fibroblastlike cells with little evidence of their differentiation into RPE cells layered on the extremely damaged areas of Bruch's membrane even at 14 days after the surgery. Conclusion. Embryonic RPE cells could grow and differentiate on the moderately damaged Bruch's membrane, while the extremely damaged Bruch's membrane did not allow them to differentiate although they could grow and cover the damaged areas.

AB - Purpose. To investigate the effect of artificially damaged Bruch's membrane on growth and differentiation of embryonic retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells transplanted into subretinal space. Methods. Embryonic RPE cells obtained from pigmented rabbits as a donor were transplanted into the subretinal space of adult albino rabbits as a host. The host RPE was removed with silicone cannula and the Bruch's membrane, was damaged with a microhooked 27-gauge needle under the detached retina in closed vitrectomy. The transplantation sites were examined by light and electron microscopy at 3, 7, and 14 days after the surgery. Results. Transplanted RPE cells were attached to the moderately damaged areas of Bruch's membrane and showed good polarity as apical microvilli and basal infoIdings as well as the formation of tight junctions with host RPE cells 3 days after the surgery. In contrast, fibroblastlike cells with little evidence of their differentiation into RPE cells layered on the extremely damaged areas of Bruch's membrane even at 14 days after the surgery. Conclusion. Embryonic RPE cells could grow and differentiate on the moderately damaged Bruch's membrane, while the extremely damaged Bruch's membrane did not allow them to differentiate although they could grow and cover the damaged areas.

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