Transcoronary cell infusion with the stop-flow technique in children with single-ventricle physiology

Takahiro Eitoku, Kenji Baba, Maiko Kondou, Yoshihiko Kurita, Yousuke Fukushima, Kenta Hirai, Shin-ichi Ohtsuki, Shuta Ishigami, Shunji Sano, Hidemasa Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Almost all reports on cardiac regeneration therapy have referred to adults, and only a few have focused on transcoronary infusion of cardiac progenitor cells using the stop-flow technique in children. Methods: Intracoronary autologous cardiosphere-derived cell (CDC) transfer was conducted at Okayama University as a phase 1 clinical trial for seven patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome between January 2011 and December 2012, and as a phase 2 clinical trial for 34 patients with single-ventricle physiology between July 2013 and March 2015. Results: A total of 41 patients with single-ventricle physiology underwent transcoronary infusion of CDC with the stop-flow technique. The median age was 33 months (range, 5–70 months) and the median weight was 10.1 kg (range, 4.1–16.0 kg). Transient adverse events occurred during the procedure, including ST-segment elevation or depression, hypotension, bradycardia, and coronary artery vasospasm. All patients completely recovered. There were no major procedure-related adverse events. In this study, transcoronary infusion of CDC using the stop-flow technique was successfully completed in all patients. Conclusion: Transcoronary infusion of CDC using the stop-flow technique in children is a feasible and safe procedure.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)240-246
Number of pages7
JournalPediatrics International
Volume60
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2018

Fingerprint

Coronary Vasospasm
Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome
Clinical Trials, Phase I
Bradycardia
Hypotension
Regeneration
Stem Cells
Clinical Trials
Weights and Measures
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • congenital heart disease
  • regeneration therapy
  • stop-flow technique
  • temporary occlusion balloon
  • transcoronary infusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Transcoronary cell infusion with the stop-flow technique in children with single-ventricle physiology. / Eitoku, Takahiro; Baba, Kenji; Kondou, Maiko; Kurita, Yoshihiko; Fukushima, Yousuke; Hirai, Kenta; Ohtsuki, Shin-ichi; Ishigami, Shuta; Sano, Shunji; Oh, Hidemasa.

In: Pediatrics International, Vol. 60, No. 3, 01.03.2018, p. 240-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eitoku, Takahiro ; Baba, Kenji ; Kondou, Maiko ; Kurita, Yoshihiko ; Fukushima, Yousuke ; Hirai, Kenta ; Ohtsuki, Shin-ichi ; Ishigami, Shuta ; Sano, Shunji ; Oh, Hidemasa. / Transcoronary cell infusion with the stop-flow technique in children with single-ventricle physiology. In: Pediatrics International. 2018 ; Vol. 60, No. 3. pp. 240-246.
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