Tomato response to salt stress

S. G. Agong, Y. Yoshida, S. Yazawa, M. Masuda

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thirteen tomato genotypes were subjected to salt treatment under hydroponics and their responses monitored in a set of two experiments with the objective of advancing them as potential salt tolerant tomato scion and/or rootstocks. Salt applications ranged from 0 to 2% NaCl with the resultant EC values of 1.4 to 37 dS·m-1, respectively. Genotypes were cultured in the experimental solutions for up to four weeks in a triplicated randomized design in the greenhouse. Significant genotypic and/or salt treatment effects were registered on plant height, leaf green meter value and area, dry matter yield, and Na+ and Cl- accumulation in tomato tissues. Salt treatment at 2% NaCl stimulated chlorophyll production per unit leaf area but caused severe depression on dry matter yield and leaf area. These results revealed that some tomato genotypes consistently showed superior biological activity at higher salinity and others exhibited greater shift in the shoot:root ratio based on dry matter biomass production, thus displaying relatively greater adaptation to salt stress. Two tomato genotypes ('Siozawa' and 'Gambaru Ne-3') displayed superior performance based on these preliminary data.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationXXVI International Horticultural Congress
Subtitle of host publicationAdvances in Vegetable Breeding
PublisherInternational Society for Horticultural Science
Pages93-97
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9789066056671
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 31 2004

Publication series

NameActa Horticulturae
Volume637
ISSN (Print)0567-7572

Keywords

  • Biological activity
  • Genotypic variation
  • Lycopersicon esculentum
  • Rootstocks
  • Salinity
  • Shift in dry matter biomass balance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Horticulture

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Tomato response to salt stress'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Agong, S. G., Yoshida, Y., Yazawa, S., & Masuda, M. (2004). Tomato response to salt stress. In XXVI International Horticultural Congress: Advances in Vegetable Breeding (pp. 93-97). (Acta Horticulturae; Vol. 637). International Society for Horticultural Science. https://doi.org/10.17660/ActaHortic.2004.637.10