The relationship between signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and bilateral occlusal contact patterns during lateral excursions

E. K. Watanabe, H. Yatani, T. Kuboki, Y. Matsuka, S. Terada, M. G. Orsini, A. Yamashita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and bilateral occlusal contact patterns was investigated in 143 TMD patients (mean age: 34.0 ± 15.9 years; 38 male and 105 female). In addition to an interview regarding chief complaints and accompanying symptoms, various muscles and the temporomandibular joints were palpated bilaterally and occlusal analyses were made. Only 5 out of 108 paired variables were found to be significantly associated by using the chi-squared test. Medial pterygoid muscle pain on palpation showed significant associations with the occlusal contact pattern (P < 0.005), especially working side contacts (interocclusal tooth contacts on the working side) (P < 0.005), during contralateral excursions; sternocleidomastoid muscle pain on palpation showed a significant association with balancing side contacts (interocclusal tooth contacts on the balancing side) during ipsilateral excursions P < 0.05); shoulder stiffness and pain in the eye showed significant associations with balancing side contacts during contralateral excursions (P < 0.05). The results show only a weak relationship between some TMD symptomatology and bilateral occlusal contact patterns during lateral excursions. The findings suggesting the specific laterality of a few TMD signs and symptoms associated with particular occlusal contacts may deserve closer case-control study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)409-415
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of oral rehabilitation
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

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