The natural thermostat of nitric oxide emission at 5.3 μm in the thermosphere observed during the solar storms of April 2002

Marty Mlynczak, Javier Martin-Torres, James Rusell, Ken Beaumont, Steven Jacobson, Janet Kozyra, Manuel Lopez-Puertas, Bernd Funke, Christopher Mertens, Larry Gordley, Richard Picard, Jeremy Winick, Peter Wintersteiner, Larry Paxton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) experiment on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite observed the infrared radiative response of the thermosphere to the solar storm events of April 2002. Large radiance enhancements were observed at 5.3 μm, which are due to emission from the vibration-rotation bands of nitric oxide (NO). The emission by NO is indicative of the conversion of solar energy to infrared radiation within the atmosphere and represents a "natural thermostat" by which heat and energy are efficiently lost from the thermosphere to space and to the lower atmosphere. We describe the SABER observations at 5.3 μm and their interpretation in terms of energy loss. The infrared enhancements remain only for a few days, indicating that such perturbations to the thermospheric state, while dramatic, are short-lived.

Original languageEnglish
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume30
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

solar storms
thermostats
thermosphere
nitric oxide
atmosphere
sounding
atmospheres
broadband
lower atmosphere
infrared radiation
augmentation
mesosphere
solar energy
radiance
ionospheres
energy
ionosphere
vibration
energetics
energy dissipation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

The natural thermostat of nitric oxide emission at 5.3 μm in the thermosphere observed during the solar storms of April 2002. / Mlynczak, Marty; Martin-Torres, Javier; Rusell, James; Beaumont, Ken; Jacobson, Steven; Kozyra, Janet; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; Funke, Bernd; Mertens, Christopher; Gordley, Larry; Picard, Richard; Winick, Jeremy; Wintersteiner, Peter; Paxton, Larry.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 30, No. 21, 01.11.2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mlynczak, M, Martin-Torres, J, Rusell, J, Beaumont, K, Jacobson, S, Kozyra, J, Lopez-Puertas, M, Funke, B, Mertens, C, Gordley, L, Picard, R, Winick, J, Wintersteiner, P & Paxton, L 2003, 'The natural thermostat of nitric oxide emission at 5.3 μm in the thermosphere observed during the solar storms of April 2002', Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 30, no. 21. https://doi.org/10.1029/2003GL017693
Mlynczak, Marty ; Martin-Torres, Javier ; Rusell, James ; Beaumont, Ken ; Jacobson, Steven ; Kozyra, Janet ; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel ; Funke, Bernd ; Mertens, Christopher ; Gordley, Larry ; Picard, Richard ; Winick, Jeremy ; Wintersteiner, Peter ; Paxton, Larry. / The natural thermostat of nitric oxide emission at 5.3 μm in the thermosphere observed during the solar storms of April 2002. In: Geophysical Research Letters. 2003 ; Vol. 30, No. 21.
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