The Mobilization and Recruitment of C-Kit+ Cells Contribute to Wound Healing after Surgery

Yoshihiro Takemoto, Tao Sheng Li, Masayuki Kubo, Mako Ohshima, Hiroshi Kurazumi, Kazuhiro Ueda, Tadahiko Enoki, Tomoaki Murata, Kimikazu Hamano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Delayed wound healing is a serious clinical problem in patients after surgery. A recent study has demonstrated that bone marrow-derived c-kit-positive (c-kit+) cells play important roles in repairing and regenerating various tissues and organs. To examine the hypothesis that surgical injury induces the mobilization and recruitment of c-kit+ cells to accelerate wound healing. Mice were subjected to a left pneumonectomy. The mobilization of c-kit+ cells was monitored after surgery. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP+) bone marrow-transplanted chimera mice, we investigated further whether the mobilized c-kit+ cells were recruited to effect wound healing in a skin puncture model. The group with left pneumonectomies increased the c-kit+ and CD34+ stem cells in peripheral blood 24 h after surgery. At 3 days after surgery, the skin wound size was observed to be significantly smaller, and the number of bone marrow-derived GFP+ cells and GFP+/c-kit+ cells in the wound tissue was significantly greater in mice that had received pneumonectomies, as compared with those that had received a sham operation. Furthermore, some of these GFP+ cells were positively expressed specific markers of macrophages (F4/80), endothelial cells (CD31), and myofibroblasts (αSMA). The administration of AMD3100, an antagonist of a stromal-cell derived factor (SDF)-1/CXCR4 signaling pathway, reduced the number of GFP+ cells in wound tissue and completely negated the accelerated wound healing. Surgical injury induces the mobilization and recruitment of c-kit+ cells to contribute to wound healing. Regulating c-kit+ cells may provide a new approach that accelerates wound healing after surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere48052
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 14 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

tissue repair
Wound Healing
Surgery
surgery
Bone
Tissue
Pneumonectomy
cells
Skin
animal injuries
bone marrow
Chemokine CXCL12
Bone Marrow
Intraoperative Complications
Macrophages
Endothelial cells
Green Fluorescent Proteins
Stem cells
skin (animal)
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Takemoto, Y., Li, T. S., Kubo, M., Ohshima, M., Kurazumi, H., Ueda, K., ... Hamano, K. (2012). The Mobilization and Recruitment of C-Kit+ Cells Contribute to Wound Healing after Surgery. PLoS One, 7(11), [e48052]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0048052

The Mobilization and Recruitment of C-Kit+ Cells Contribute to Wound Healing after Surgery. / Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Li, Tao Sheng; Kubo, Masayuki; Ohshima, Mako; Kurazumi, Hiroshi; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Enoki, Tadahiko; Murata, Tomoaki; Hamano, Kimikazu.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 11, e48052, 14.11.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takemoto, Y, Li, TS, Kubo, M, Ohshima, M, Kurazumi, H, Ueda, K, Enoki, T, Murata, T & Hamano, K 2012, 'The Mobilization and Recruitment of C-Kit+ Cells Contribute to Wound Healing after Surgery', PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 11, e48052. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0048052
Takemoto Y, Li TS, Kubo M, Ohshima M, Kurazumi H, Ueda K et al. The Mobilization and Recruitment of C-Kit+ Cells Contribute to Wound Healing after Surgery. PLoS One. 2012 Nov 14;7(11). e48052. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0048052
Takemoto, Yoshihiro ; Li, Tao Sheng ; Kubo, Masayuki ; Ohshima, Mako ; Kurazumi, Hiroshi ; Ueda, Kazuhiro ; Enoki, Tadahiko ; Murata, Tomoaki ; Hamano, Kimikazu. / The Mobilization and Recruitment of C-Kit+ Cells Contribute to Wound Healing after Surgery. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 11.
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