The long-term results of extendable endoprostheses of the humerus in children after the resection of a bone sarcoma

Y. Tsuda, T. Fujiwara, J. D. Stevenson, M. C. Parry, R. Tillman, A. Abudu

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims The purpose of this study was to report the long-term results of extendable endoprostheses of the humerus in children after the resection of a bone sarcoma. Methods A total of 35 consecutive patients treated with extendable endoprosthetic replacement of the humerus in children were included. There were 17 boys and 18 girls in the series with a median age at the time of initial surgery of nine years (interquartile range (IQR) 7 to 11). Results The median follow-up time was 10.6 years (IQR 3.9 to 20.4). The overall implant survival at ten years was 75%. Complications occurred in 13 patients (37%). Subluxation at the proximal humerus occurred in 19 patients (54%) but only six (17%) were symptomatic. Subluxation was seen more commonly in children under the age of nine years (86%) than in those aged nine years or more (33%) (p = 0.002). Implant failure occurred in nine patients (26%): The most common cause was aseptic loosening (four patients, 11%). Lengthening of the implant was carried out in 23 patients (66%). At final follow up, three patients had a limb that was shortened by 5 cm or more. The mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) functional score was 79% (73% to 90%). Conclusion Extendable endoprosthetic replacement is a reliable method of reconstructing humerus after excision of a bone sarcoma. Children who are less than nine years old have a high risk of subluxation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-71
Number of pages8
JournalBone and Joint Journal
Volume102
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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