The long-term outcomes of modified Harrington procedure using antegrade pins for periacetabular metastasis and haematological diseases

R. Tillman, Y. Tsuda, M. Puthiya Veettil, D. Sree, T. Fujiwara, A. Abudu, P. S. Young

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims The aim of this study was to present the long-term surgical outcomes, complications, implant survival, and causes of implant failure in patients treated with the modified Harrington procedure using antegrade large diameter pins. Patients and Methods A cohort of 50 consecutive patients who underwent the modified Harrington procedure for periacetabular metastasis or haematological malignancy between January 1996 and April 2018 were studied. The median follow-up time for all survivors was 3.2 years (interquartile range 0.9 to 7.6 years). Results The five-year overall survival rate was 33% for all the patients. However, implant survival rates were 100% and 46% at five and ten years, respectively. Eight patients survived beyond five years. There was no immediate perioperative mortality or complications. A total of 15 late complications occurred in 11 patients (22%). Five patients (10%) required further surgery to treat complications. The most frequent complication was pin breakage without evidence of acetabular loosening (6%). Two patients (4%) underwent revision for aseptic loosening at 6.5 and 8.9 years after surgery. Ambulatory status and pain level were improved in 83% and 89%, respectively. Conclusion The modified Harrington procedure for acetabular destruction has low complication rates, good functional outcome, and improved pain relief in selected patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1557-1562
Number of pages6
JournalBone and Joint Journal
Volume101-B
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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