The importance of identifying the true catalyst when using Randles-Sevcik equation to calculate turnover frequency

Zahra Abdi, Matthias Vandichel, Alla S. Sologubenko, Marc Georg Willinger, Jian Ren Shen, Suleyman I. Allakhverdiev, Mohammad Mahdi Najafpour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Water splitting will become important to store excess renewable electrical energy into hydrogen. Although the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER) by water oxidation is a critical reaction for water splitting, further investigations are needed to find the details of the OER mechanism for various electrocatalysts. More in particular for homogeneous electrocatalysts, the Randles-Sevcik equation has been extensively applied to determine the turnover frequency (TOF). Herein, using vitamin B12 as a case study, we show that the dynamical deposition/dissolution of the heterogeneous catalyst during OER makes the Randles-Sevcik equation too complicated to be used for calculating the TOF. Indeed, the conventionally applied post-characterization methods do not provide sufficient accuracy to prove the homogeneity of OER mechanisms; thus, using the Randles-Sevcik equation to calculate the TOF is not necessarily correct.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)37774-37781
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy
Volume46
Issue number76
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 3 2021

Keywords

  • Metal complex
  • Precatalyst
  • Randles-Sevcik equation
  • True catalyst
  • Water oxidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Fuel Technology
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology

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