The identification of distinct high-frequency oscillations during spikes delineates the seizure onset zone better than high-frequency spectral power changes

Julia Jacobs, Christina Vogt, Pierre LeVan, Rina Zelmann, Jean Gotman, Katsuhiro Kobayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Interictal high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, 80-500. Hz) can predict the seizure onset zone (SOZ), but visual detection of HFOs is time consuming. Time-frequency analysis can reveal large high-frequency (HF) power changes (80-500. Hz) associated with inter-ictal spikes. The present study determines how well the rate of HFOs and spike-related HF power changes were co-localized with SOZ. Methods: We analyzed 583 channels (68 in the SOZ) sampled from 14 patients who underwent intracranial EEG recording. We determined if the rate of visually-marked HFOs and spike-related HF power changes differed between SOZ and non-SOZ. Results: Significantly higher rates of HFOs were found in SOZ. The degree of spike-related HF power augmentation failed to differ between SOZ and non-SOZ, whereas that of post-spike HF power attenuation was significantly more severe in SOZ compared to in non-SOZ. Regions showing HFOs and large spike-related HF-changes showed a partial overlap in distribution in 7/14 patients. Conclusions: Strong HF augmentation during spikes and high HFO rates occurred over different brain locations. The rate of HFOs showed the best performance in identifying SOZ. Post-spike HF power attenuation may represent increased inhibition in these channels and should be investigated further. Significance: Strong HF power changes during spikes and HFOs per se seem to reflect distinct phenomena.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2015

Fingerprint

Seizures
Stroke
Brain

Keywords

  • Epilepsy surgery
  • Fast ripple
  • Ripple
  • Seizure onset zone
  • Spikes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Sensory Systems

Cite this

The identification of distinct high-frequency oscillations during spikes delineates the seizure onset zone better than high-frequency spectral power changes. / Jacobs, Julia; Vogt, Christina; LeVan, Pierre; Zelmann, Rina; Gotman, Jean; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, 2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6bd849e2ae574336abbe3efc8254ae11,
title = "The identification of distinct high-frequency oscillations during spikes delineates the seizure onset zone better than high-frequency spectral power changes",
abstract = "Objective: Interictal high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, 80-500. Hz) can predict the seizure onset zone (SOZ), but visual detection of HFOs is time consuming. Time-frequency analysis can reveal large high-frequency (HF) power changes (80-500. Hz) associated with inter-ictal spikes. The present study determines how well the rate of HFOs and spike-related HF power changes were co-localized with SOZ. Methods: We analyzed 583 channels (68 in the SOZ) sampled from 14 patients who underwent intracranial EEG recording. We determined if the rate of visually-marked HFOs and spike-related HF power changes differed between SOZ and non-SOZ. Results: Significantly higher rates of HFOs were found in SOZ. The degree of spike-related HF power augmentation failed to differ between SOZ and non-SOZ, whereas that of post-spike HF power attenuation was significantly more severe in SOZ compared to in non-SOZ. Regions showing HFOs and large spike-related HF-changes showed a partial overlap in distribution in 7/14 patients. Conclusions: Strong HF augmentation during spikes and high HFO rates occurred over different brain locations. The rate of HFOs showed the best performance in identifying SOZ. Post-spike HF power attenuation may represent increased inhibition in these channels and should be investigated further. Significance: Strong HF power changes during spikes and HFOs per se seem to reflect distinct phenomena.",
keywords = "Epilepsy surgery, Fast ripple, Ripple, Seizure onset zone, Spikes",
author = "Julia Jacobs and Christina Vogt and Pierre LeVan and Rina Zelmann and Jean Gotman and Katsuhiro Kobayashi",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.clinph.2015.04.053",
language = "English",
journal = "Clinical Neurophysiology",
issn = "1388-2457",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The identification of distinct high-frequency oscillations during spikes delineates the seizure onset zone better than high-frequency spectral power changes

AU - Jacobs, Julia

AU - Vogt, Christina

AU - LeVan, Pierre

AU - Zelmann, Rina

AU - Gotman, Jean

AU - Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Objective: Interictal high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, 80-500. Hz) can predict the seizure onset zone (SOZ), but visual detection of HFOs is time consuming. Time-frequency analysis can reveal large high-frequency (HF) power changes (80-500. Hz) associated with inter-ictal spikes. The present study determines how well the rate of HFOs and spike-related HF power changes were co-localized with SOZ. Methods: We analyzed 583 channels (68 in the SOZ) sampled from 14 patients who underwent intracranial EEG recording. We determined if the rate of visually-marked HFOs and spike-related HF power changes differed between SOZ and non-SOZ. Results: Significantly higher rates of HFOs were found in SOZ. The degree of spike-related HF power augmentation failed to differ between SOZ and non-SOZ, whereas that of post-spike HF power attenuation was significantly more severe in SOZ compared to in non-SOZ. Regions showing HFOs and large spike-related HF-changes showed a partial overlap in distribution in 7/14 patients. Conclusions: Strong HF augmentation during spikes and high HFO rates occurred over different brain locations. The rate of HFOs showed the best performance in identifying SOZ. Post-spike HF power attenuation may represent increased inhibition in these channels and should be investigated further. Significance: Strong HF power changes during spikes and HFOs per se seem to reflect distinct phenomena.

AB - Objective: Interictal high-frequency oscillations (HFOs, 80-500. Hz) can predict the seizure onset zone (SOZ), but visual detection of HFOs is time consuming. Time-frequency analysis can reveal large high-frequency (HF) power changes (80-500. Hz) associated with inter-ictal spikes. The present study determines how well the rate of HFOs and spike-related HF power changes were co-localized with SOZ. Methods: We analyzed 583 channels (68 in the SOZ) sampled from 14 patients who underwent intracranial EEG recording. We determined if the rate of visually-marked HFOs and spike-related HF power changes differed between SOZ and non-SOZ. Results: Significantly higher rates of HFOs were found in SOZ. The degree of spike-related HF power augmentation failed to differ between SOZ and non-SOZ, whereas that of post-spike HF power attenuation was significantly more severe in SOZ compared to in non-SOZ. Regions showing HFOs and large spike-related HF-changes showed a partial overlap in distribution in 7/14 patients. Conclusions: Strong HF augmentation during spikes and high HFO rates occurred over different brain locations. The rate of HFOs showed the best performance in identifying SOZ. Post-spike HF power attenuation may represent increased inhibition in these channels and should be investigated further. Significance: Strong HF power changes during spikes and HFOs per se seem to reflect distinct phenomena.

KW - Epilepsy surgery

KW - Fast ripple

KW - Ripple

KW - Seizure onset zone

KW - Spikes

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84929439146&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84929439146&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.clinph.2015.04.053

DO - 10.1016/j.clinph.2015.04.053

M3 - Article

C2 - 25998203

AN - SCOPUS:84929439146

JO - Clinical Neurophysiology

JF - Clinical Neurophysiology

SN - 1388-2457

ER -