The glasgow prognostic score determined during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is an independent predictor of survival for cervical cancer

Takeshi Nishida, Keiichiro Nakamura, Junko Haraga, Chikako Ogawa, Tomoyuki Kusumoto, Noriko Seki, Hisashi Masuyama, Norihisa Katayama, Susumu Kanazawa, Yuji Hiramatsu

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective The Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) determined at pretreatment is important in the prediction of prognosis in various cancers. We investigated if the GPS used both at pretreatment and during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) could predict the prognosis of patients with cervical cancer. Methods We collected GPS and clinicopathological data from the medical records of 91 patients who underwent CCRT for cervical cancer; their GPSs at pretreatment and during CCRT were retrospectively analyzed for correlations with recurrence and survival. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox's proportional hazard regression was used for univariate and multivariate analyses. Results The median follow-up for all patients who were alive at the time of last follow-up was 38.0 months (range, 1-108 months). The DFS and OS rates of patients with a high GPS during CCRT (GPS 1 + 2; 55 patients; 60.4%) were significantly shorter than those for patients with a low GPS (GPS 0; 36 patients; 39.6%) (DFS, P <0.001; OS, P <0.001). Furthermore, multivariate analyses showed that high GPS during CCRT was an independent prognostic factor of survival for OS (P = 0.008). Conclusions During CCRT, a high GPS was revealed to be an important predictor of survival for cervical cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1306-1314
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecological Cancer
Volume25
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 5 2015

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Chemoradiotherapy
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Survival
Disease-Free Survival
Multivariate Analysis
Nonparametric Statistics
Medical Records
Survival Rate
Recurrence
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • During concurrent chemoradiotherapy
  • Glasgow prognostic score
  • Predictor for poor prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Oncology

Cite this

@article{36c4a776dbec482b83be85b32ceb0a83,
title = "The glasgow prognostic score determined during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is an independent predictor of survival for cervical cancer",
abstract = "Objective The Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) determined at pretreatment is important in the prediction of prognosis in various cancers. We investigated if the GPS used both at pretreatment and during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) could predict the prognosis of patients with cervical cancer. Methods We collected GPS and clinicopathological data from the medical records of 91 patients who underwent CCRT for cervical cancer; their GPSs at pretreatment and during CCRT were retrospectively analyzed for correlations with recurrence and survival. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox's proportional hazard regression was used for univariate and multivariate analyses. Results The median follow-up for all patients who were alive at the time of last follow-up was 38.0 months (range, 1-108 months). The DFS and OS rates of patients with a high GPS during CCRT (GPS 1 + 2; 55 patients; 60.4{\%}) were significantly shorter than those for patients with a low GPS (GPS 0; 36 patients; 39.6{\%}) (DFS, P <0.001; OS, P <0.001). Furthermore, multivariate analyses showed that high GPS during CCRT was an independent prognostic factor of survival for OS (P = 0.008). Conclusions During CCRT, a high GPS was revealed to be an important predictor of survival for cervical cancer.",
keywords = "Cervical cancer, During concurrent chemoradiotherapy, Glasgow prognostic score, Predictor for poor prognosis",
author = "Takeshi Nishida and Keiichiro Nakamura and Junko Haraga and Chikako Ogawa and Tomoyuki Kusumoto and Noriko Seki and Hisashi Masuyama and Norihisa Katayama and Susumu Kanazawa and Yuji Hiramatsu",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1097/IGC.0000000000000485",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "1306--1314",
journal = "International Journal of Gynecological Cancer",
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publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - The glasgow prognostic score determined during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is an independent predictor of survival for cervical cancer

AU - Nishida, Takeshi

AU - Nakamura, Keiichiro

AU - Haraga, Junko

AU - Ogawa, Chikako

AU - Kusumoto, Tomoyuki

AU - Seki, Noriko

AU - Masuyama, Hisashi

AU - Katayama, Norihisa

AU - Kanazawa, Susumu

AU - Hiramatsu, Yuji

PY - 2015/9/5

Y1 - 2015/9/5

N2 - Objective The Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) determined at pretreatment is important in the prediction of prognosis in various cancers. We investigated if the GPS used both at pretreatment and during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) could predict the prognosis of patients with cervical cancer. Methods We collected GPS and clinicopathological data from the medical records of 91 patients who underwent CCRT for cervical cancer; their GPSs at pretreatment and during CCRT were retrospectively analyzed for correlations with recurrence and survival. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox's proportional hazard regression was used for univariate and multivariate analyses. Results The median follow-up for all patients who were alive at the time of last follow-up was 38.0 months (range, 1-108 months). The DFS and OS rates of patients with a high GPS during CCRT (GPS 1 + 2; 55 patients; 60.4%) were significantly shorter than those for patients with a low GPS (GPS 0; 36 patients; 39.6%) (DFS, P <0.001; OS, P <0.001). Furthermore, multivariate analyses showed that high GPS during CCRT was an independent prognostic factor of survival for OS (P = 0.008). Conclusions During CCRT, a high GPS was revealed to be an important predictor of survival for cervical cancer.

AB - Objective The Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) determined at pretreatment is important in the prediction of prognosis in various cancers. We investigated if the GPS used both at pretreatment and during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) could predict the prognosis of patients with cervical cancer. Methods We collected GPS and clinicopathological data from the medical records of 91 patients who underwent CCRT for cervical cancer; their GPSs at pretreatment and during CCRT were retrospectively analyzed for correlations with recurrence and survival. Statistical analyses were performed using the Mann-Whitney U test. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox's proportional hazard regression was used for univariate and multivariate analyses. Results The median follow-up for all patients who were alive at the time of last follow-up was 38.0 months (range, 1-108 months). The DFS and OS rates of patients with a high GPS during CCRT (GPS 1 + 2; 55 patients; 60.4%) were significantly shorter than those for patients with a low GPS (GPS 0; 36 patients; 39.6%) (DFS, P <0.001; OS, P <0.001). Furthermore, multivariate analyses showed that high GPS during CCRT was an independent prognostic factor of survival for OS (P = 0.008). Conclusions During CCRT, a high GPS was revealed to be an important predictor of survival for cervical cancer.

KW - Cervical cancer

KW - During concurrent chemoradiotherapy

KW - Glasgow prognostic score

KW - Predictor for poor prognosis

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