The expression and clinical significance of connective tissue growth factor in advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer

Ryoko Kikuchi, Yoshihiro Kikuchi, Hitoshi Tsuda, Hitoshi Maekawa, Ken ichi Kozaki, Issei Imoto, Seiichi Tamai, Akihiro Shiotani, Keiichi Iwaya, Masaru Sakamoto, Takao Sekiya, Osamu Matsubara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been reported to play critical roles in the tumorigenesis of several human malignancies. This study was performed to evaluate CTGF protein expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Surgical specimens from 76 primary HNSCC were obtained with written informed consents and the expression level of CTGF was immunohistochemically evaluated. The cytoplasmic immunoreactivity of CTGF in cancer cells was semiquantitatively classified into low and high expression. Among all 76 cases with or without neoadjuvant therapy, low CTGF showed significantly longer (P = 0.0282) overall survival (OS), but not disease-free survival (DFS) than high CTGF. Although low CTGF in patients with stage I, II and III did not result in any significant difference of the OS and DFS, stage IV HNSCC patients with low CTGF showed significantly longer OS (P = 0.032) and DFS (P = 0.0107) than those with high CTGF. These differences in stage IV cases were also confirmed using multivariate analyses. These results suggest that low CTGF in stage IV HNSCC is an independent prognostic factor, despite with or without neoadjuvant therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121-128
Number of pages8
JournalHuman Cell
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

Keywords

  • Connective tissue growth factor
  • Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma
  • Molecular target
  • Neoadjuvant therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Cancer Research

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