The effects of mechanical stress on the growth, differentiation, and paracrine factor production of cardiac stem cells

Hiroshi Kurazumi, Masayuki Kubo, Mako Ohshima, Yumi Yamamoto, Yoshihiro Takemoto, Ryo Suzuki, Shigeru Ikenaga, Akihito Mikamo, Koichi Udo, Kimikazu Hamano, Tao Sheng Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stem cell therapies have been clinically employed to repair the injured heart, and cardiac stem cells are thought to be one of the most potent stem cell candidates. The beating heart is characterized by dynamic mechanical stresses, which may have a significant impact on stem cell therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate how mechanical stress affects the growth and differentiation of cardiac stem cells and their release of paracrine factors. In this study, human cardiac stem cells were seeded in a silicon chamber and mechanical stress was then induced by cyclic stretch stimulation (60 cycles/min with 120% elongation). Cells grown in non-stretched silicon chambers were used as controls. Our result revealed that mechanical stretching significantly reduced the total number of surviving cells, decreased Ki-67-positive cells, and increased TUNEL-positive cells in the stretched group 24 hrs after stretching, as compared to the control group. Interestingly, mechanical stretching significantly increased the release of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-1β as well as the angiogenic growth factors VEGF and bFGF from the cells in 12 hrs. Furthermore, mechanical stretching significantly reduced the percentage of c-kit-positive stem cells, but increased the expressions of cardiac troponin-I and smooth muscle actin in cells 3 days after stretching. Using a traditional stretching model, we demonstrated that mechanical stress suppressed the growth and proliferation of cardiac stem cells, enhanced their release of inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors, and improved their myogenic differentiation. The development of this in vitro approach may help elucidate the complex mechanisms of stem cell therapy for heart failure.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere28890
JournalPLoS One
Volume6
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 28 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Growth Differentiation Factors
Mechanical Stress
mechanical stress
production economics
Stem cells
stem cells
Stem Cells
Stretching
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Angiogenesis Inducing Agents
Cells
Silicon
cells
silicon
therapeutics
cytokines
heart
Cytokines
Troponin I
interleukin-1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Kurazumi, H., Kubo, M., Ohshima, M., Yamamoto, Y., Takemoto, Y., Suzuki, R., ... Li, T. S. (2011). The effects of mechanical stress on the growth, differentiation, and paracrine factor production of cardiac stem cells. PLoS One, 6(12), [e28890]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0028890

The effects of mechanical stress on the growth, differentiation, and paracrine factor production of cardiac stem cells. / Kurazumi, Hiroshi; Kubo, Masayuki; Ohshima, Mako; Yamamoto, Yumi; Takemoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Ryo; Ikenaga, Shigeru; Mikamo, Akihito; Udo, Koichi; Hamano, Kimikazu; Li, Tao Sheng.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 6, No. 12, e28890, 28.12.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kurazumi, H, Kubo, M, Ohshima, M, Yamamoto, Y, Takemoto, Y, Suzuki, R, Ikenaga, S, Mikamo, A, Udo, K, Hamano, K & Li, TS 2011, 'The effects of mechanical stress on the growth, differentiation, and paracrine factor production of cardiac stem cells', PLoS One, vol. 6, no. 12, e28890. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0028890
Kurazumi, Hiroshi ; Kubo, Masayuki ; Ohshima, Mako ; Yamamoto, Yumi ; Takemoto, Yoshihiro ; Suzuki, Ryo ; Ikenaga, Shigeru ; Mikamo, Akihito ; Udo, Koichi ; Hamano, Kimikazu ; Li, Tao Sheng. / The effects of mechanical stress on the growth, differentiation, and paracrine factor production of cardiac stem cells. In: PLoS One. 2011 ; Vol. 6, No. 12.
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