The effect of perceived social support on psychological distress and life satisfaction among Nepalese migrants in Japan

Januka Khatiwada, Basilua Andre Muzembo, Koji Wada, Shunya Ikeda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The world is becoming individualized due to modernization. International migration is one of the factors that lead to family dissociation and a lack of social support. Social support is viewed as a crucial factor that contributes to psychological well-being and satisfaction with life among migrants. However, very little is known about the impacts of social support on psychological distress and satisfaction with life among migrants. Therefore, we conducted this study to assess the association of perceived social support with psychological distress and satisfaction with life among Nepalese migrants, and we evaluated the factors associated with receiving social support. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted with a convenience sample of Nepalese migrants (N = 249) living in Tokyo. Self-administered online questionnaires were distributed using social networks and chain referral methods. The measures included the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, the General Health Questionnaire, and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Descriptive analysis, Pearson's correlation analysis, and multiple linear regression analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 25. Results The mean (SD) age of the respondents was 31.8 years old (7.3). The family, friends, and significant others subscales of the multidimensional scale of perceived social support were negatively correlated with psychological distress (p<0.01). The family subscale was positively correlated with satisfaction with life (p<0.05), and the friend and significant others subscales were positively correlated with satisfaction with life (p<0.01). Social support from the family was significantly and negatively associated with the type of visa (Beta = -0.160, p = 0.049), and marital status was negatively associated with support from significant others (Beta = -0.175, p = 0.024). Conclusion Social support from family, friends, and significant others was found to be influential in decreasing psychological distress and increasing satisfaction with life among Nepalese migrants in Tokyo. Strengthing social support system through the expansion of interpersonal network may help minimize the psychological distress.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0246271
JournalPloS one
Volume16
Issue number2 Febuary
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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