The disruption of spatial cognition and changes in brain amino acid, monoamine and acetylcholine in rats with transient cerebral ischemia

Katsunori Iwasaki, Yoshihisa Kitamura, Yusuke Ohgami, Kenichi Mishima, Michihiro Fujiwara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the disruption of spatial cognition due to transient forebrain ischemia using an 8-arm radial arm maze task in rats. Five or 10 min of ischemia did not affect the task acquisition. When rats established spatial cognition by daily training of the task, 10 min of ischemia significantly decreased the number of correct choices and increased the errors in the task when performed 24 h after reperfusion. These changes, however, returned to the normal level after about 4 days of daily training. Glutamic acid (Glu) and acetylcholine (ACh) release from the dorsal hippocampus (DH) was observed to transiently increase during ischemia. However, neither the content of noradrenaline (NA) nor the release of NA in the DH changed during ischemia. The NA and ACh release from the DH, however, gradually decreased during reperfusion, and the decrease became significant at 24 h after reperfusion. The NA content of the frontal cortex (FC) and the DH increased 7 days after reperfusion. These results suggest that the disruption of spatial cognition induced by 10 min of ischemia may be attributed to a greater degree to the dysfunction of the hippocampal ACh and NA, and cortical NA systems, rather than to the development of neuronal cell death in these areas.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-172
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Research
Volume709
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 19 1996
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 8-Arm radial maze task
  • Acetylcholine
  • Cerebral ischemia
  • Glutamate
  • Microdialysis
  • Noradrenaline
  • Spatial cognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The disruption of spatial cognition and changes in brain amino acid, monoamine and acetylcholine in rats with transient cerebral ischemia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this