The cognitive foundation of long- distance interaction and its relation to social contexts

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The concept of “coexistence” presupposes some sort of difference to be maintained through interaction. If the differences were to diminish, the process would be called “assimilation” or “integration.” The meaning of being different has become an important question as we are experiencing the most intensive communication and interaction across the world. This chapter discusses the nature of long-distance interaction as an example of coexistence that has emerged in many parts of the world. I consider that long-distance interactions have played significant roles at various stages of human history, and understanding the mechanism of these interactions will give us insights into how people interact and coexist with “different” peoples or societies. This chapter explores the theoretical implications of the archaeological study of long-distance interaction, focusing on the cognitive foundation of these interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCoexistence and Cultural Transmission in East Asia
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages31-47
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781315432205
ISBN (Print)9781598743357
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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