The chemokine MCP-1 (CCL2) in the host interaction with cancer: A foe or ally?

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Macrophages are one of the most abundant leukocyte populations infiltrating tumor tissues and can exhibit both tumoricidal and tumor-promoting activities. In 1989, we reported the purification of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from culture supernatants of mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tumor cells. MCP-1 is a potent monocyte-attracting chemokine, identical to the previously described lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor or tumor-derived chemotactic factor, and greatly contributes to the recruitment of blood monocytes into sites of inflammatory responses and tumors. Because in vitro-cultured tumor cells often produce significant amounts of MCP-1, tumor cells are considered to be the main source of MCP-1. However, various non-tumor cells in the tumor stroma also produce MCP-1 in response to stimuli. Studies performed in vitro and in vivo have provided evidence that MCP-1 production in tumors is a consequence of complex interactions between tumor cells and non-tumor cells and that both tumor cells and non-tumor cells contribute to the production of MCP-1. Although MCP-1 production was once considered to be a part of host defense against tumors, it is now believed to regulate the vicious cycle between tumor cells and macrophages that promotes the progression of tumors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-345
Number of pages11
JournalCellular and Molecular Immunology
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2018

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Chemokine CCL2
Chemokines
Neoplasms
metsulfuron methyl
Monocytes
Macrophages
Cultured Tumor Cells
Chemotactic Factors
Mitogens
Blood Cells
Leukocytes

Keywords

  • Chemokines
  • Cytokines
  • Inflammation
  • Macrophages
  • Tumor microenvironment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

The chemokine MCP-1 (CCL2) in the host interaction with cancer : A foe or ally? / Yoshimura, Teizo.

In: Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Vol. 15, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 335-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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