The BESS-polar ultra-thin superconducting solenoid magnet and its operational characteristics during long-duration scientific ballooning over antarctica

Yasuhiro Makida, Akira Yamamoto, Koji Yoshimura, Ken Ichi Tanaka, Ju N.Ichi Suzuki, Shinya Matsuda, Masata Hasegawa, Atsushi Horikoshi, Ryoko Shinoda, Kenichi Sakai, Shoichi Mizumaki, Reiko Orito, Yousuke Matsukawa, Akira Kusumoto, John W. Mitchell, Robert E. Streitmatter, Thomas Hams, Makoto Sasaki, Neeharika Thakur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An ultra-thin superconducting solenoid has been developed for a cosmic-ray spectrometer ballooning over Antarctica, which is named BESS-Polar II. The coil with a diameter of 0.9 m, a length of 1.4 m and a thickness of 3.5 mm, is wound with high- strength aluminum stabilized superconductor and provides 0.8 T in the spectrometer. Based on the experience at the BESS-Polar-I solenoid flight for nine days in 2004, the BESS-Polar-II solenoid, which was cryogenically improved, realized a persistent current mode operation for 25 days in the second flight campaign in December 2007 though January 2008. It has contributed to accumulate the cosmic-ray observation data with 4700 million events and 16 terabyte in a hard disk unit. This report will describe the second solenoid performance during the flight.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5067034
Pages (from-to)1315-1319
Number of pages5
JournalIEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aluminum stabilized superconductor
  • BESS
  • Balloon-borne experiment
  • Detector magnet
  • Thin solenoid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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