The acquisition process of children's game songs during peer teaching

A semi-structured experiment with pre-school children

Yoko Ogawa, Tadahiro Murao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A semi-structured experiment was conducted to identify children's acquisition processes when learning playground game songs. Participants in the study were 20 pairs of children aged 4, 5, and 6 years, with each pair consisting of a younger child-learner and a senior child-teacher. The pairs were divided into two groups; Group 1 was observed by a researcher and a video-recorder, while Group 2 was observed using only a video-recorder. All child-teachers were well-acquainted with how to play the games, however the games were unfamiliar to the child-learners. Results suggest that child-teachers change their strategy of teaching depending on the conditions of instruction. Child-teachers in Group 1 used a variety of strategies including: demonstrating; playing and singing with the learner; slowing down; and, instructing. In contrast, child-teachers in Group 2: demonstrated; frequently played with the learner; sang alone; and, increased the tempo and rate of repetition even though the child-learners did not understand. In Group 1 over 50% of the time was devoted to demonstration by child-teachers, 40% to children playing together, and 5% to dialogue. In Group 2, over 90% of the time was devoted to the children playing together, and approximately 10% to demonstration by child-teachers. The article suggests that this latter instruction mode is not only a common feature of child-teachers' teaching in Group 2, it is also reflective of the teaching strategies of the masters of Japanese traditional music.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-78
Number of pages10
JournalResearch Studies in Music Education
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

preschool child
song
experiment
Teaching
teacher
Group
Experiment
Song
Preschool children
Peers
video
instruction
playground
singing
teaching strategy
learning process
music

Keywords

  • Acquisition process of technique
  • Children's game songs
  • Learning strategy
  • Masters of Japanese traditional music
  • Peer teaching
  • Teaching strategy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Music
  • Education

Cite this

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abstract = "A semi-structured experiment was conducted to identify children's acquisition processes when learning playground game songs. Participants in the study were 20 pairs of children aged 4, 5, and 6 years, with each pair consisting of a younger child-learner and a senior child-teacher. The pairs were divided into two groups; Group 1 was observed by a researcher and a video-recorder, while Group 2 was observed using only a video-recorder. All child-teachers were well-acquainted with how to play the games, however the games were unfamiliar to the child-learners. Results suggest that child-teachers change their strategy of teaching depending on the conditions of instruction. Child-teachers in Group 1 used a variety of strategies including: demonstrating; playing and singing with the learner; slowing down; and, instructing. In contrast, child-teachers in Group 2: demonstrated; frequently played with the learner; sang alone; and, increased the tempo and rate of repetition even though the child-learners did not understand. In Group 1 over 50{\%} of the time was devoted to demonstration by child-teachers, 40{\%} to children playing together, and 5{\%} to dialogue. In Group 2, over 90{\%} of the time was devoted to the children playing together, and approximately 10{\%} to demonstration by child-teachers. The article suggests that this latter instruction mode is not only a common feature of child-teachers' teaching in Group 2, it is also reflective of the teaching strategies of the masters of Japanese traditional music.",
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