Temperature scanning FTIR analysis of hydrogen bonding states of various saccharides in amorphous matrixes below and above their glass transition temperatures

Koreyoshi Imamura, Keisuke Sakaura, Ken Ichi Ohyama, Atsushi Fukushima, Hiroyuki Imanaka, Takaharu Sakiyama, Kazuhiro Nakanishi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Temperature scanning Fourier transform infrared, TS-FTIR, spectroscopy of various amorphous sugar matrixes was conducted to investigate the relationship between the glass transition temperature, Tg, of an amorphous sugar matrix and the nature of the hydrogen bonds in the matrix. An amorphous sugar matrix was prepared by air-drying an aqueous solution of sugar, and the degree of formation of hydrogen bonds in the matrix was evaluated at different temperatures using the peak positions of the IR band corresponding to the O-H stretching vibration at around 3400 cm-1. The Tg value increased with increasing peak position of the O-H stretching vibration at Tg and were correlated reasonably well with the magnitude of the peak shift by the temperature increase (from 25°C) to the Tg value. This demonstrates that the amorphous sugar matrix, in which the segments are fixed by fewer hydrogen bonds, has a higher thermal resistance. The glycosidic linkage largely contributes to the restriction of the segments, pyranose ring, rather than a hydrogen bond. As the degree of polymerization of pyranose rings increases, the degree of hydrogen bond formation needed to hold the matrix in a fixed position decreases. However, the magnitude of the restriction of pyranose rings by a glycosidic linkage changes depending on the type: the restrictions imposed by a-1,1 and -1,6 glycosidic linkages are the tightest and most flexible of all of the types of glycosidic linkages, respectively.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15094-15099
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume110
Issue number31
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 10 2006

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carbohydrates
glass transition temperature
Hydrogen bonds
sugars
Sugars
Scanning
scanning
linkages
hydrogen
matrices
hydrogen bonds
constrictions
Temperature
temperature
Stretching
rings
vibration
thermal resistance
Glass transition temperature
Heat resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Temperature scanning FTIR analysis of hydrogen bonding states of various saccharides in amorphous matrixes below and above their glass transition temperatures. / Imamura, Koreyoshi; Sakaura, Keisuke; Ohyama, Ken Ichi; Fukushima, Atsushi; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Sakiyama, Takaharu; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 110, No. 31, 10.08.2006, p. 15094-15099.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Imamura, Koreyoshi ; Sakaura, Keisuke ; Ohyama, Ken Ichi ; Fukushima, Atsushi ; Imanaka, Hiroyuki ; Sakiyama, Takaharu ; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro. / Temperature scanning FTIR analysis of hydrogen bonding states of various saccharides in amorphous matrixes below and above their glass transition temperatures. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B. 2006 ; Vol. 110, No. 31. pp. 15094-15099.
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