Tactile priming modulates the activation of the fronto-parietal circuit during tactile angle match and non-match processing: An fMRI study

Jiajia Yang, Yinghua Yu, Akinori Kunita, Qiang Huang, Jinglong Wu, Nobukatsu Sawamoto, Hidenao Fukuyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The repetition of a stimulus task reduces the neural activity within certain cortical regions responsible for working memory (WM) processing. Although previous evidence has shown that repeated vibrotactile stimuli reduce the activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, whether the repeated tactile spatial stimuli triggered the priming effect correlated with the same cortical region remains unclear. Therefore, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a delayed match-to-sample task to investigate the contributions of the priming effect to tactile spatial WM processing. Fourteen healthy volunteers were asked to encode three tactile angle stimuli during the encoding phase and one tactile angle stimulus during the recognition phase. Then, they answered whether the last angle stimulus was presented during the encoding phase. As expected, both the Match and Non-Match tasks activated a similar cerebral network. The critical new finding was decreased brain activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and bilateral medial frontal gyri (mFG) for the match task compared to the Non-Match task. Therefore, we suggest that the tactile priming engaged repetition suppression mechanisms during tactile angle matching, and this process decreased the activation of the fronto-parietal circuit, including IFG, mFG and PPC.

Original languageEnglish
Article number926
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Volume8
Issue numberDEC
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 15 2014

Keywords

  • Delayed match to sample task
  • FMRI
  • Priming effect
  • Tactile spatial working memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

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