Synaptic-like microvesicles, synaptic vesicle counterparts in endocrine cells, are involved in a novel regulatory mechanism for the synthesis and secretion of hormones

Yoshinori Moriyama, Mitsuko Hayashi, Hiroshi Yamada, Shouki Yatsushiro, Shougo Ishio, Akitsugu Yamamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microvesicles in endocrine cells are the morphological and functional equivalent of neuronal synaptic vesicles. Microvesicles accumulate various neurotransmitters through a transmitter-specific vesicular transporter energized by vacuolar H+-ATPase. We found that mammalian pinealocytes, endocrine cells that synthesize and secrete melatonin, accumulate L-glutamate in their microvesicles and secrete it through exocytosis. Pinealocytes use L-glutamate as either a paracrine- or autocrine-like chemical transmitter in a receptor-mediated manner, resulting in inhibition of melatonin synthesis. In this article, we briefly describe the overall features of the microvesicle-mediated signal-transduction mechanism in the pineal gland and discuss the important role of acidic organelles in a novel regulatory mechanism for hormonal synthesis and secretion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)117-125
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Biology
Volume203
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2000

Keywords

  • Autocrine
  • Endocrine cell
  • L-glutamate
  • Melatonin
  • Microvesicle
  • Paracrine
  • Pin ealocyte
  • Serotonin
  • V-ATPase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Physiology
  • Aquatic Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Insect Science

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