Succession of lactic acid bacteria in wilted rhodesgrass silage assessed by plate culture and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

Suraya Parvin, Naoki Nishino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in low-moisture rhodesgrass (Chrolis gayana Kunth) silage, involved in the fermentation process, were determined by plate culture and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The first harvest of rhodesgrass was wilted (581 g dry matter kg-1) and stored in laboratory silos for 15, 30, 90 and 180 days. The concentration of acetic acid was found to be more than that of lactic acid until day 30, while lactic acid was the major fermentation product after day 90. Both plate culture and DGGE analyses indicated that Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis and Lactococcus lactis were the principal LAB present during the period of ensiling. Similar results were obtained with the two methods with respect to the LAB species, but neither of the methods could account for the change in the fermentation products over the period of ensiling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-55
Number of pages5
JournalGrassland Science
Volume56
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Fingerprint

silage
denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis
lactic acid bacteria
electrokinesis
gel
silage making
lactic acid
bacterium
acid
fermentation
silage fermentation
Lactobacillus brevis
Lactococcus lactis
Lactobacillus plantarum
acetic acid
dry matter
methodology
moisture

Keywords

  • Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis
  • Lactic acid bacteria
  • Silage
  • Tropical grass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Plant Science

Cite this

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abstract = "Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in low-moisture rhodesgrass (Chrolis gayana Kunth) silage, involved in the fermentation process, were determined by plate culture and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The first harvest of rhodesgrass was wilted (581 g dry matter kg-1) and stored in laboratory silos for 15, 30, 90 and 180 days. The concentration of acetic acid was found to be more than that of lactic acid until day 30, while lactic acid was the major fermentation product after day 90. Both plate culture and DGGE analyses indicated that Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis and Lactococcus lactis were the principal LAB present during the period of ensiling. Similar results were obtained with the two methods with respect to the LAB species, but neither of the methods could account for the change in the fermentation products over the period of ensiling.",
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AU - Nishino, Naoki

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N2 - Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in low-moisture rhodesgrass (Chrolis gayana Kunth) silage, involved in the fermentation process, were determined by plate culture and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The first harvest of rhodesgrass was wilted (581 g dry matter kg-1) and stored in laboratory silos for 15, 30, 90 and 180 days. The concentration of acetic acid was found to be more than that of lactic acid until day 30, while lactic acid was the major fermentation product after day 90. Both plate culture and DGGE analyses indicated that Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis and Lactococcus lactis were the principal LAB present during the period of ensiling. Similar results were obtained with the two methods with respect to the LAB species, but neither of the methods could account for the change in the fermentation products over the period of ensiling.

AB - Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in low-moisture rhodesgrass (Chrolis gayana Kunth) silage, involved in the fermentation process, were determined by plate culture and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The first harvest of rhodesgrass was wilted (581 g dry matter kg-1) and stored in laboratory silos for 15, 30, 90 and 180 days. The concentration of acetic acid was found to be more than that of lactic acid until day 30, while lactic acid was the major fermentation product after day 90. Both plate culture and DGGE analyses indicated that Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis and Lactococcus lactis were the principal LAB present during the period of ensiling. Similar results were obtained with the two methods with respect to the LAB species, but neither of the methods could account for the change in the fermentation products over the period of ensiling.

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