Structure, Function, and Variations of the Photosystem I-Antenna Supercomplex from Different Photosynthetic Organisms

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Photosystem I (PSI) is a protein complex functioning in light-induced charge separation, electron transfer, and reduction reactions of ferredoxin in photosynthesis, which finally results in the reduction of NAD(P) to NAD(P)H required for the fixation of carbon dioxide. In eukaryotic algae, PSI is associated with light-harvesting complex I (LHCI) subunits, forming a PSI-LHCI supercomplex. LHCI harvests and transfers light energy to the PSI core, where charge separation and electron transfer reactions occur. During the course of evolution, the number and sequences of protein subunits and the pigments they bind in LHCI change dramatically depending on the species of organisms, which is a result of adaptation of organisms to various light environments. In this chapter, I will describe the structure of various PSI-LHCI supercomplexes from different organisms solved so far either by X-ray crystallography or by cryo-electron microscopy, with emphasis on the differences in the number, structures, and association patterns of LHCI subunits associated with the PSI core found in different organisms.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSubcellular Biochemistry
PublisherSpringer Science and Business Media B.V.
Pages351-377
Number of pages27
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Publication series

NameSubcellular Biochemistry
Volume99
ISSN (Print)0306-0225

Keywords

  • Cryo-electron microscopy
  • Energy harvesting
  • Energy transfer
  • Light-harvesting complex
  • Photosystem I
  • X-ray crystallography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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