Structure and enzymatic properties of genetically truncated forms of the water-insoluble glucan-synthesizing glucosyltransferase from Streptococcus sobrinus

Norifumi Konishi, Yasuhiro Torii, Tatsuo Yamamoto, Atsushi Miyagi, Hiroyuki Ohta, Kazuhiro Fukui, Satoshi Hanamoto, Hideki Matsuno, Hideyuki Komatsu, Takao Kodama, Eisaku Katayama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glucosyltransferase-I (GTF-I: 175 kDa) of a cariogenic bacterium, Streptococcus sobrinus 6715, mediates the conversion of water-soluble dextran (α-1,6-glucan) into a water-insoluble form by making numerous α-1,3-glucan branches along the dextran chains with sucrose as the glucosyl donor. The structures and catalytic properties were compared for two GTF-I fragments, GTF-I' (138 kDa) and GS (110 kDa). Both lack the N-terminal 84 residues of GTF-I. While GTF-I' still contains four of the six C-terminal repeats characteristic of streptococcal glucosyltransferases, GS lacks all of them. Electron microscopy of negatively stained samples indicated a double-domain structure for GTF-I', consisting of a spherical head with a smaller spherical tail, which was occasionally seen as a long extension. GS was seen just as the head portion of GTF-I'. In the absence of dextran, both fragments simply hydrolyzed sucrose with similar K(m) and k(cat) values at low concentrations (< 5 mM). At higher sucrose concentrations (> 10 mM), however, GTF-I' exhibited glucosyl transfer activity to form insoluble α-1,3-glucans. So did GS, but less efficiently. Dextran increased the rate and efficiency of the glucosyl transfer by GTF-I'. On removal of the C-terminal repeats of GTF-I' by mild trypsin treatment, this dextran-stimulated transfer was completely lost and the dextran-independent transfer became less efficient. These results indicate that the N-terminal two-thirds of the GTF-I sequence are organized as a structurally and functionally independent domain to catalyze not only sucrose hydrolysis but also glucosyl transfer to form α-1,3-glucan chains, although not efficiently; the C-terminal repeat increases the efficiency of the intrinsic glucosyl transfer by the N-terminal domain as well as rendering the whole molecule primer-dependent for far more efficient insoluble glucan synthesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-295
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of biochemistry
Volume126
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Keywords

  • C-terminal repeats
  • Dextran
  • Domain structure
  • Glucosyltransferase
  • α-1,3-glucan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

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