Structural transformations of heat-treated bacterial iron oxide

Hideki Hashimoto, Tatsuo Fujii, Shinji Kohara, Koji Nakanishi, Chihiro Yogi, Herwig Peterlik, Makoto Nakanishi, Jun Takada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A bacterial siliceous iron oxide microtubule (diameter: ca. 1 μm, 15Fe2O3·8SiO2·P2O5·30H2O) produced by Leptothrix ochracea was heat treated in air and its structural transformation was investigated in detail by microscopy, diffractometry, and spectroscopy. Although the heat-treated bacterial iron oxide retained its original microtubular structure, its nanoscopic, middle-range, and local structures changed drastically. Upon heat treatment, nanosized pores were formed and their size changed depending on temperature. The Fe-O-Si linkages were gradually cleaved with increasing temperature, causing the progressive separation of Fe and Si ions into iron oxide and amorphous silicate phases, respectively. Concomitantly, global connectivity and local structure of FeO6 octahedra in the iron oxide nanoparticles systematically changed depending on temperature. These comprehensive investigations clearly revealed various structural changes of the bacterial iron oxide which is an important guideline for the future exploration of novel bio-inspired materials.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-75
Number of pages9
JournalMaterials Chemistry and Physics
Volume155
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Iron oxides
iron oxides
heat
Silicates
linkages
Temperature
temperature
silicates
Microscopic examination
heat treatment
Heat treatment
Hot Temperature
ferric oxide
Spectroscopy
Ions
Nanoparticles
microscopy
porosity
nanoparticles
air

Keywords

  • Amorphous materials
  • Composite materials
  • Nanostructures
  • Oxides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Hashimoto, H., Fujii, T., Kohara, S., Nakanishi, K., Yogi, C., Peterlik, H., ... Takada, J. (2015). Structural transformations of heat-treated bacterial iron oxide. Materials Chemistry and Physics, 155, 67-75. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.matchemphys.2015.01.067

Structural transformations of heat-treated bacterial iron oxide. / Hashimoto, Hideki; Fujii, Tatsuo; Kohara, Shinji; Nakanishi, Koji; Yogi, Chihiro; Peterlik, Herwig; Nakanishi, Makoto; Takada, Jun.

In: Materials Chemistry and Physics, Vol. 155, 01.04.2015, p. 67-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hashimoto, Hideki ; Fujii, Tatsuo ; Kohara, Shinji ; Nakanishi, Koji ; Yogi, Chihiro ; Peterlik, Herwig ; Nakanishi, Makoto ; Takada, Jun. / Structural transformations of heat-treated bacterial iron oxide. In: Materials Chemistry and Physics. 2015 ; Vol. 155. pp. 67-75.
@article{6f46f494ba7440eda5004f37ebfc75bf,
title = "Structural transformations of heat-treated bacterial iron oxide",
abstract = "A bacterial siliceous iron oxide microtubule (diameter: ca. 1 μm, 15Fe2O3·8SiO2·P2O5·30H2O) produced by Leptothrix ochracea was heat treated in air and its structural transformation was investigated in detail by microscopy, diffractometry, and spectroscopy. Although the heat-treated bacterial iron oxide retained its original microtubular structure, its nanoscopic, middle-range, and local structures changed drastically. Upon heat treatment, nanosized pores were formed and their size changed depending on temperature. The Fe-O-Si linkages were gradually cleaved with increasing temperature, causing the progressive separation of Fe and Si ions into iron oxide and amorphous silicate phases, respectively. Concomitantly, global connectivity and local structure of FeO6 octahedra in the iron oxide nanoparticles systematically changed depending on temperature. These comprehensive investigations clearly revealed various structural changes of the bacterial iron oxide which is an important guideline for the future exploration of novel bio-inspired materials.",
keywords = "Amorphous materials, Composite materials, Nanostructures, Oxides",
author = "Hideki Hashimoto and Tatsuo Fujii and Shinji Kohara and Koji Nakanishi and Chihiro Yogi and Herwig Peterlik and Makoto Nakanishi and Jun Takada",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.matchemphys.2015.01.067",
language = "English",
volume = "155",
pages = "67--75",
journal = "Materials Chemistry and Physics",
issn = "0254-0584",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Structural transformations of heat-treated bacterial iron oxide

AU - Hashimoto, Hideki

AU - Fujii, Tatsuo

AU - Kohara, Shinji

AU - Nakanishi, Koji

AU - Yogi, Chihiro

AU - Peterlik, Herwig

AU - Nakanishi, Makoto

AU - Takada, Jun

PY - 2015/4/1

Y1 - 2015/4/1

N2 - A bacterial siliceous iron oxide microtubule (diameter: ca. 1 μm, 15Fe2O3·8SiO2·P2O5·30H2O) produced by Leptothrix ochracea was heat treated in air and its structural transformation was investigated in detail by microscopy, diffractometry, and spectroscopy. Although the heat-treated bacterial iron oxide retained its original microtubular structure, its nanoscopic, middle-range, and local structures changed drastically. Upon heat treatment, nanosized pores were formed and their size changed depending on temperature. The Fe-O-Si linkages were gradually cleaved with increasing temperature, causing the progressive separation of Fe and Si ions into iron oxide and amorphous silicate phases, respectively. Concomitantly, global connectivity and local structure of FeO6 octahedra in the iron oxide nanoparticles systematically changed depending on temperature. These comprehensive investigations clearly revealed various structural changes of the bacterial iron oxide which is an important guideline for the future exploration of novel bio-inspired materials.

AB - A bacterial siliceous iron oxide microtubule (diameter: ca. 1 μm, 15Fe2O3·8SiO2·P2O5·30H2O) produced by Leptothrix ochracea was heat treated in air and its structural transformation was investigated in detail by microscopy, diffractometry, and spectroscopy. Although the heat-treated bacterial iron oxide retained its original microtubular structure, its nanoscopic, middle-range, and local structures changed drastically. Upon heat treatment, nanosized pores were formed and their size changed depending on temperature. The Fe-O-Si linkages were gradually cleaved with increasing temperature, causing the progressive separation of Fe and Si ions into iron oxide and amorphous silicate phases, respectively. Concomitantly, global connectivity and local structure of FeO6 octahedra in the iron oxide nanoparticles systematically changed depending on temperature. These comprehensive investigations clearly revealed various structural changes of the bacterial iron oxide which is an important guideline for the future exploration of novel bio-inspired materials.

KW - Amorphous materials

KW - Composite materials

KW - Nanostructures

KW - Oxides

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84924545190&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84924545190&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.matchemphys.2015.01.067

DO - 10.1016/j.matchemphys.2015.01.067

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84924545190

VL - 155

SP - 67

EP - 75

JO - Materials Chemistry and Physics

JF - Materials Chemistry and Physics

SN - 0254-0584

ER -