Static method to evaluate interaction forces by AFM

Naoyuki Ishida, Masanobu Sakamoto, Minoru Miyahara, Ko Higashitani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An atomic force microscope (AFM) is a very powerful tool to evaluate interaction forces between surfaces in liquids on the molecular scale, but the apparatus was not designed to measure forces in equilibrium. Hence, data obtained by AFM are not in equilibrium in principle. Here we propose a static method to obtain interaction forces between stationary surfaces in aqueous solutions using AFM. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by comparing interaction forces measured by this method with those by the normal dynamic method for the system of a mica plate and a silica particle in electrolyte solutions where an equilibrium was nearly achieved because water molecules and ions moved much faster than surfaces. The applicability of this method to the measurement of hydrophobic attraction was then examined, and important information on the attraction was obtained.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-193
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Colloid and Interface Science
Volume235
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Microscopes
microscopes
Mica
interactions
Silicon Dioxide
Electrolytes
attraction
Silica
Ions
Molecules
Water
Liquids
mica
electrolytes
silicon dioxide
aqueous solutions
liquids
water
molecules
ions

Keywords

  • Atomic force microscope
  • Equilibrated interaction force
  • Hydrophobic attraction
  • Static measurement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Surfaces and Interfaces

Cite this

Static method to evaluate interaction forces by AFM. / Ishida, Naoyuki; Sakamoto, Masanobu; Miyahara, Minoru; Higashitani, Ko.

In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, Vol. 235, No. 1, 01.03.2001, p. 190-193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ishida, Naoyuki ; Sakamoto, Masanobu ; Miyahara, Minoru ; Higashitani, Ko. / Static method to evaluate interaction forces by AFM. In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science. 2001 ; Vol. 235, No. 1. pp. 190-193.
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