Solar and wind exergy potentials for Mars

Alfonso Delgado-Bonal, Javier Martin-Torres, Sandra Vázquez-Martín, María Paz Zorzano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The energy requirements of the planetary exploration spacecrafts constrain the lifetime of the missions, their mobility and capabilities, and the number of instruments onboard. They are limiting factors in planetary exploration. Several missions to the surface of Mars have proven the feasibility and success of solar panels as energy source. The analysis of the exergy efficiency of the solar radiation has been carried out successfully on Earth, however, to date, there is not an extensive research regarding the thermodynamic exergy efficiency of in-situ renewable energy sources on Mars. In this paper, we analyse the obtainable energy (exergy) from solar radiation under Martian conditions. For this analysis we have used the surface environmental variables on Mars measured in-situ by the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station onboard the Curiosity rover and from satellite by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer instrument onboard the Mars Global Surveyor satellite mission. We evaluate the exergy efficiency from solar radiation on a global spatial scale using orbital data for a Martian year; and in a one single location in Mars (the Gale crater) but with an appreciable temporal resolution (1 h). Also, we analyse the wind energy as an alternative source of energy for Mars exploration and compare the results with those obtained on Earth. We study the viability of solar and wind energy station for the future exploration of Mars, showing that a small square solar cell of 0.30 m length could maintain a meteorological station on Mars. We conclude that the low density of the atmosphere of Mars is responsible of the low thermal exergy efficiency of solar panels. It also makes the use of wind energy uneffective. Finally, we provide insights for the development of new solar cells on Mars.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)550-558
Number of pages9
JournalEnergy
Volume102
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Exergy
Solar radiation
Wind power
Solar cells
Earth (planet)
Satellites
Solar energy
Spacecraft
Spectrometers
Thermodynamics
Monitoring
Hot Temperature

Keywords

  • Mars
  • Renewable energy
  • Second law analysis
  • Solar exergy
  • Wind energy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Pollution
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Delgado-Bonal, A., Martin-Torres, J., Vázquez-Martín, S., & Zorzano, M. P. (2016). Solar and wind exergy potentials for Mars. Energy, 102, 550-558. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2016.02.110

Solar and wind exergy potentials for Mars. / Delgado-Bonal, Alfonso; Martin-Torres, Javier; Vázquez-Martín, Sandra; Zorzano, María Paz.

In: Energy, Vol. 102, 01.05.2016, p. 550-558.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Delgado-Bonal, A, Martin-Torres, J, Vázquez-Martín, S & Zorzano, MP 2016, 'Solar and wind exergy potentials for Mars', Energy, vol. 102, pp. 550-558. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2016.02.110
Delgado-Bonal A, Martin-Torres J, Vázquez-Martín S, Zorzano MP. Solar and wind exergy potentials for Mars. Energy. 2016 May 1;102:550-558. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.energy.2016.02.110
Delgado-Bonal, Alfonso ; Martin-Torres, Javier ; Vázquez-Martín, Sandra ; Zorzano, María Paz. / Solar and wind exergy potentials for Mars. In: Energy. 2016 ; Vol. 102. pp. 550-558.
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