Social identification of embodied interactive agent

Y. Takeuchi, Keigo Watanabe, Y. Katagiri

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An embodiment interactive agent has a virtual body that is generally drawn by CG animation. We intuitively assume that the agent's body primarily expresses non-verbal messages, or symbolizes its social characteristics through its appearance. However, we have not objectively elucidated the expressive competence of an agent's body beyond the conclusions of our empirical and subjective intuition. Therefore, it is necessary to explore scientifically how do users regard the functional competence of an agent's embodiment. Do users attribute the intelligence of an agent to its virtual body? We investigated how users physically interact with an agent even though it is merely a virtual entity drawn by CG on the display, through "showing" something to the eye of the agent, "listening" something from the mouth of the agent, and "speaking" something to the ear of the agent. However, such interaction does not necessarily attribute the intellectual processing function to the agent, and this issue is explored through two psychological experiments.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication
Pages449-454
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes
EventRO-MAN 2004 - 13th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication - Okayama, Japan
Duration: Sep 20 2004Sep 22 2004

Other

OtherRO-MAN 2004 - 13th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication
CountryJapan
CityOkayama
Period9/20/049/22/04

Fingerprint

Animation
Display devices
Processing
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Takeuchi, Y., Watanabe, K., & Katagiri, Y. (2004). Social identification of embodied interactive agent. In Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication (pp. 449-454)

Social identification of embodied interactive agent. / Takeuchi, Y.; Watanabe, Keigo; Katagiri, Y.

Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication. 2004. p. 449-454.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Takeuchi, Y, Watanabe, K & Katagiri, Y 2004, Social identification of embodied interactive agent. in Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication. pp. 449-454, RO-MAN 2004 - 13th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication, Okayama, Japan, 9/20/04.
Takeuchi Y, Watanabe K, Katagiri Y. Social identification of embodied interactive agent. In Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication. 2004. p. 449-454
Takeuchi, Y. ; Watanabe, Keigo ; Katagiri, Y. / Social identification of embodied interactive agent. Proceedings - IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication. 2004. pp. 449-454
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