Social disclosure among coworkers without disabilities in supported employment settings

Yoshihisa Ohtake, Janis G. Chadsey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The depth and breadth of reported self-disclosure by workers without disabilities (respondents) for three types of coworkers (i.e work acquaintances, work friends, and social friends) were assessed. Reported self-disclosure of coworkers to supported employees was also compared, and the extent to which self-disclosure by respondents to job coaches correlated with intimacy of relationships between supported employees and respondents was analyzed. Results indicated that depth of self-disclosure can contribute to friendship formation, but coworkers did little self-disclosing to supported employees. Self-disclosure to job coaches did not correlate significantly with the development of relationships between the coworkers and supported employees. There is a need to teach supported employees to self-disclose to their coworkers and to prompt coworkers to talk about themselves in depth.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)25-35
Number of pages11
JournalMental Retardation
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1999

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Supported Employment
Self Disclosure
co-worker
Disclosure
disability
employee
coach
intimacy
friendship
worker
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Social disclosure among coworkers without disabilities in supported employment settings. / Ohtake, Yoshihisa; Chadsey, Janis G.

In: Mental Retardation, Vol. 37, No. 1, 02.1999, p. 25-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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