Smoking among adults with serious psychological distress: Analysis of anonymized data from a national cross-sectional survey in Japan

Masaki Fujiwara, Masatoshi Inagaki, Naoki Nakaya, Maiko Fujimori, Yuji Higuchi, Kyoko Kakeda, Yosuke Uchitomi, Norihito Yamada

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Smoking behavior among people with serious psychological distress (SPD) has not been fully investigated in Asia, although smoking has become a public health concern worldwide. Many Western population-based studies indicate that people with psychological distress are more likely to smoke. Methods: This study used a national representative data set from the 2010 Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions of Japan. SPD was defined as scores ≥13 or greater on the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between SPD and current smoking in Japanese adults. Results: In both men (n = 27,937) and women (n = 30,786), SPD was significantly associated with current smoking (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals]: 1.169 [1.030–1.328] for men and 1.677 [1.457–1.931] for women). Among men, SPD was significantly associated with current smoking only in people aged ≥50 years (1.519 [1.232–1.874]) and married (1.456 [1.228–1.728]). SPD was significantly associated with current smoking in women of all ages. SPD had a greater impact on current smoking for women aged 20–49 years than for those aged ≥50 years (1.832 [1.552–2.162] and 1.445 [1.099–1.900], respectively). Limitations: The cross-sectional design precludes assumptions about the direction of causality. In addition, smoking status was self-reported. Conclusions: SPD was significantly associated with current smoking in Japan and the association was much stronger for younger women. Clinical strategies are needed to reduce the prevalence of smoking among people with SPD to reduce excess mortality in this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-137
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume239
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 15 2018

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Japan
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking
Psychology
Social Conditions
Smoke
Causality
Population
Public Health
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Confidence Intervals
Mortality

Keywords

  • Cigarette
  • Depression
  • Mental disorders
  • Psychological distress
  • Smoking
  • Tobacco

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Smoking among adults with serious psychological distress : Analysis of anonymized data from a national cross-sectional survey in Japan. / Fujiwara, Masaki; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Nakaya, Naoki; Fujimori, Maiko; Higuchi, Yuji; Kakeda, Kyoko; Uchitomi, Yosuke; Yamada, Norihito.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 239, 15.10.2018, p. 131-137.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fujiwara, Masaki ; Inagaki, Masatoshi ; Nakaya, Naoki ; Fujimori, Maiko ; Higuchi, Yuji ; Kakeda, Kyoko ; Uchitomi, Yosuke ; Yamada, Norihito. / Smoking among adults with serious psychological distress : Analysis of anonymized data from a national cross-sectional survey in Japan. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2018 ; Vol. 239. pp. 131-137.
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abstract = "Background: Smoking behavior among people with serious psychological distress (SPD) has not been fully investigated in Asia, although smoking has become a public health concern worldwide. Many Western population-based studies indicate that people with psychological distress are more likely to smoke. Methods: This study used a national representative data set from the 2010 Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions of Japan. SPD was defined as scores ≥13 or greater on the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between SPD and current smoking in Japanese adults. Results: In both men (n = 27,937) and women (n = 30,786), SPD was significantly associated with current smoking (adjusted odds ratios [95{\%} confidence intervals]: 1.169 [1.030–1.328] for men and 1.677 [1.457–1.931] for women). Among men, SPD was significantly associated with current smoking only in people aged ≥50 years (1.519 [1.232–1.874]) and married (1.456 [1.228–1.728]). SPD was significantly associated with current smoking in women of all ages. SPD had a greater impact on current smoking for women aged 20–49 years than for those aged ≥50 years (1.832 [1.552–2.162] and 1.445 [1.099–1.900], respectively). Limitations: The cross-sectional design precludes assumptions about the direction of causality. In addition, smoking status was self-reported. Conclusions: SPD was significantly associated with current smoking in Japan and the association was much stronger for younger women. Clinical strategies are needed to reduce the prevalence of smoking among people with SPD to reduce excess mortality in this population.",
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T1 - Smoking among adults with serious psychological distress

T2 - Analysis of anonymized data from a national cross-sectional survey in Japan

AU - Fujiwara, Masaki

AU - Inagaki, Masatoshi

AU - Nakaya, Naoki

AU - Fujimori, Maiko

AU - Higuchi, Yuji

AU - Kakeda, Kyoko

AU - Uchitomi, Yosuke

AU - Yamada, Norihito

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Y1 - 2018/10/15

N2 - Background: Smoking behavior among people with serious psychological distress (SPD) has not been fully investigated in Asia, although smoking has become a public health concern worldwide. Many Western population-based studies indicate that people with psychological distress are more likely to smoke. Methods: This study used a national representative data set from the 2010 Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions of Japan. SPD was defined as scores ≥13 or greater on the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between SPD and current smoking in Japanese adults. Results: In both men (n = 27,937) and women (n = 30,786), SPD was significantly associated with current smoking (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals]: 1.169 [1.030–1.328] for men and 1.677 [1.457–1.931] for women). Among men, SPD was significantly associated with current smoking only in people aged ≥50 years (1.519 [1.232–1.874]) and married (1.456 [1.228–1.728]). SPD was significantly associated with current smoking in women of all ages. SPD had a greater impact on current smoking for women aged 20–49 years than for those aged ≥50 years (1.832 [1.552–2.162] and 1.445 [1.099–1.900], respectively). Limitations: The cross-sectional design precludes assumptions about the direction of causality. In addition, smoking status was self-reported. Conclusions: SPD was significantly associated with current smoking in Japan and the association was much stronger for younger women. Clinical strategies are needed to reduce the prevalence of smoking among people with SPD to reduce excess mortality in this population.

AB - Background: Smoking behavior among people with serious psychological distress (SPD) has not been fully investigated in Asia, although smoking has become a public health concern worldwide. Many Western population-based studies indicate that people with psychological distress are more likely to smoke. Methods: This study used a national representative data set from the 2010 Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions of Japan. SPD was defined as scores ≥13 or greater on the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze the association between SPD and current smoking in Japanese adults. Results: In both men (n = 27,937) and women (n = 30,786), SPD was significantly associated with current smoking (adjusted odds ratios [95% confidence intervals]: 1.169 [1.030–1.328] for men and 1.677 [1.457–1.931] for women). Among men, SPD was significantly associated with current smoking only in people aged ≥50 years (1.519 [1.232–1.874]) and married (1.456 [1.228–1.728]). SPD was significantly associated with current smoking in women of all ages. SPD had a greater impact on current smoking for women aged 20–49 years than for those aged ≥50 years (1.832 [1.552–2.162] and 1.445 [1.099–1.900], respectively). Limitations: The cross-sectional design precludes assumptions about the direction of causality. In addition, smoking status was self-reported. Conclusions: SPD was significantly associated with current smoking in Japan and the association was much stronger for younger women. Clinical strategies are needed to reduce the prevalence of smoking among people with SPD to reduce excess mortality in this population.

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KW - Mental disorders

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KW - Smoking

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