Single-stage repair of aortic coarctation with ventricular septal defect using isolated cerebral and myocardial perfusion

Kozo Ishino, Masaaki Kawada, Hiroyuki Irie, Koichi Kino, Shunji Sano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To avoid hypothermic circulatory arrest, we have repaired aortic coarctation with ventricular septal defect (VSD) in a one-stage procedure using an isolated cerebral and myocardial perfusion technique, and retrospectively compared this novel approach to the conventional two-stage approach. Methods: Between October 1991 and February 1999, 24 infants, aged 4-137 days (median, 27 days) and weighing 1.7-4.3 kg (median, 3.0 kg), underwent the repair of aortic coarctation with VSD either in one (group I, n = 11) or two stages (group II, n = 13). In Group I, an arterial cannula for cardiopulmonary bypass was inserted into the ascending aorta in six patients with coarctation only, or into a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft which was anastomosed to the innominate artery in the remaining five who had hypoplastic arches. A cross-clamp was placed between the innominate and left carotid arteries. The bypass flow was reduced to 30-50% of full flow at 28°C, thereby maintaining a radial artery pressure of 30-45 mmHg. At this point, the aortic coarctation was repaired by an end-to-end arch anastomosis, while maintaining brain perfusion and with the heart still beating. In five patients with hypoplastic aortic arches, the innominate artery proximal to the graft was then secured down and the arch anastomosis was extended to the distal ascending aorta, while providing isolated cerebral perfusion and cardioplegic arrest. After arch reconstruction was performed, the clamp was moved onto the ascending aorta, and the VSD was closed with systemic perfusion. In contrast, for group II patients, coarctation repairs were performed through a posterolateral approach, and existing VSDs were closed as secondary procedures. Results: The mean isolated cerebral and myocardial perfusion time for group I was 13 min (range, 7-20 min). The myocardial ischemic time did not differ between groups I and II (43 ± 4 vs. 42 ± 5 min, not significant). There were no hospital mortalities or neurological complications in either group, but one late death in each group. Conclusion: Single-stage repair of aortic coarctation with VSD does not increase myocardial ischemic time compared to the traditional two-stage approach. The isolated cerebral and myocardial perfusion technique may offer substantial brain and myocardial protection during aortic arch reconstruction. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)538-542
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2000

Keywords

  • Cerebral perfusion
  • Circulatory arrest
  • Coarctation
  • Ventricular septal defect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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