Short-term safety of an anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 messenger RNA vaccine for patients with advanced lung cancer treated with anticancer drugs: A multicenter, prospective, observational study

Tomoki Tamura, Kiichiro Ninomiya, Toshio Kubo, Shoichi Kuyama, Sayaka Tachibana, Koji Inoue, Kenichi Chikamori, Kenichiro Kudo, Nobuaki Ochi, Daijiro Harada, Yoshinobu Maeda, Katsuyuki Kiura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Since 2020, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has become prevalent worldwide. In severe cases, the case fatality rate is high, and vaccine prevention is important. This study evaluated the safety of receiving SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in patients with advanced lung cancer receiving anticancer therapy. Methods: We prospectively enrolled patients receiving anticancer drugs for advanced lung cancer who planned to receive SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. Early adverse events within 7 days of vaccine injection were evaluated using patient-reported surveys. The chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. Results: Among 120 patients receiving lung cancer treatment, 73 were men; the mean age of the patients was 73.5 years. The treatments received for lung cancer at the time of the first vaccine injection were chemotherapy, ICIs, combined chemotherapy and ICIs, and targeted therapies, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, in 30, 28, 17, and 45 patients, respectively. All patients received SARS-CoV-2 messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccine. After the second mRNA vaccine dose, 15.4% of patients had fever of 38°C (95% confidence interval: 9.34%–23.2%); this rate was slightly higher than that for healthy participants at the time of the BNT162b2 trial. Patients treated with cytotoxic anticancer drugs tended to have high fever. In the multivariate analyses, male sex was associated with higher fever frequencies. However, there were no serious early adverse events due to vaccination. Conclusions: Anti-SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination tends to be safe, but fever following vaccination tends to be more common among patients undergoing lung cancer treatment than among healthy individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-459
Number of pages7
JournalThoracic Cancer
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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