Short or irregular sleep duration in early childhood increases risk of injury for primary school-age children: A nationwide longitudinal birth cohort in Japan

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal relationship between shorter or irregular sleep duration (SD) in early childhood and increased risk of injury at primary school age using data from a nationwide survey in Japan. We categorized SD into seven groups: 6 h, 7 h, 8 h, 9 hrs, 10 or 11 h, >12 h, and irregular, based on questionnaire responses collected at 5.5 years old. The relationship between SD and incidence of injury at 5.5–nine years of age is shown. In addition, we completed a stratified analysis on children with or without problematic behavior at eight years old. We included 32,044 children, of which 6369 were classified as having an injury and 25,675 as not having an injury. Logistic regression model showed that shorter or irregular SD categories were associated with an increased adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for injuries (6 h: aOR 1.40, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19–1.66, 7 h: aOR 1.10, 95% CI, 0.98–1.23, 8 h: aOR 1.13, 95% CI, 1.02–1.26, irregular: aOR 1.26, 95% CI 1.10–1.43). The same tendency was observed with shorter or irregular SD in subgroups with or without behavioral problems. Shorter or irregular sleep habits during early childhood are associated with injury during primary school age.

Original languageEnglish
Article number9512
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume18
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Longitudinal study
  • Problematic behavior
  • Sleep habits
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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