Sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord control male sexual functions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lower spinal cord injuries frequently cause sexual dysfunction in men, including erectile dysfunction and an ejaculation disorder. This indicates that the important neural centers for male sexual function are located within the lower spinal cord. It is interesting that the lumbar spinal segments contain several neural circuits, showing a clear sexually dimorphism that, in association with neural circuits of the thoracic and sacral spinal cord, are critical in expressing penile reflexes during sexual behavior. To date, many sex differences in the spinal cord have been discovered. Interestingly, most of these are male dominant. Substantial evidence of sexually dimorphic neural circuits in the spinal cord have been reported in many animal models, but major issues remain unknown. For example, it is not known how the different circuits cooperatively function during male sexual behavior. In this review, therefore, the anatomical and functional significance of the sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord corresponding to the expression of male sexual behavior is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberArticle 184
JournalFrontiers in Neuroscience
Issue number8 JUL
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Spinal Cord
Sexual Behavior
Ejaculation
Erectile Dysfunction
Spinal Cord Injuries
Sex Characteristics
Reflex
Thorax
Animal Models

Keywords

  • Male sexual function
  • Neuroanatomy
  • Sexual dimorphism
  • Spinal cord
  • Steroid hormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord control male sexual functions. / Sakamoto, Hirotaka.

In: Frontiers in Neuroscience, No. 8 JUL, Article 184, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{dbdf3818cdb34e7c9f72e9e0e5a21fea,
title = "Sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord control male sexual functions",
abstract = "Lower spinal cord injuries frequently cause sexual dysfunction in men, including erectile dysfunction and an ejaculation disorder. This indicates that the important neural centers for male sexual function are located within the lower spinal cord. It is interesting that the lumbar spinal segments contain several neural circuits, showing a clear sexually dimorphism that, in association with neural circuits of the thoracic and sacral spinal cord, are critical in expressing penile reflexes during sexual behavior. To date, many sex differences in the spinal cord have been discovered. Interestingly, most of these are male dominant. Substantial evidence of sexually dimorphic neural circuits in the spinal cord have been reported in many animal models, but major issues remain unknown. For example, it is not known how the different circuits cooperatively function during male sexual behavior. In this review, therefore, the anatomical and functional significance of the sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord corresponding to the expression of male sexual behavior is discussed.",
keywords = "Male sexual function, Neuroanatomy, Sexual dimorphism, Spinal cord, Steroid hormones",
author = "Hirotaka Sakamoto",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.3389/fnins.2014.00184",
language = "English",
journal = "Frontiers in Neuroscience",
issn = "1662-4548",
publisher = "Frontiers Research Foundation",
number = "8 JUL",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord control male sexual functions

AU - Sakamoto, Hirotaka

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Lower spinal cord injuries frequently cause sexual dysfunction in men, including erectile dysfunction and an ejaculation disorder. This indicates that the important neural centers for male sexual function are located within the lower spinal cord. It is interesting that the lumbar spinal segments contain several neural circuits, showing a clear sexually dimorphism that, in association with neural circuits of the thoracic and sacral spinal cord, are critical in expressing penile reflexes during sexual behavior. To date, many sex differences in the spinal cord have been discovered. Interestingly, most of these are male dominant. Substantial evidence of sexually dimorphic neural circuits in the spinal cord have been reported in many animal models, but major issues remain unknown. For example, it is not known how the different circuits cooperatively function during male sexual behavior. In this review, therefore, the anatomical and functional significance of the sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord corresponding to the expression of male sexual behavior is discussed.

AB - Lower spinal cord injuries frequently cause sexual dysfunction in men, including erectile dysfunction and an ejaculation disorder. This indicates that the important neural centers for male sexual function are located within the lower spinal cord. It is interesting that the lumbar spinal segments contain several neural circuits, showing a clear sexually dimorphism that, in association with neural circuits of the thoracic and sacral spinal cord, are critical in expressing penile reflexes during sexual behavior. To date, many sex differences in the spinal cord have been discovered. Interestingly, most of these are male dominant. Substantial evidence of sexually dimorphic neural circuits in the spinal cord have been reported in many animal models, but major issues remain unknown. For example, it is not known how the different circuits cooperatively function during male sexual behavior. In this review, therefore, the anatomical and functional significance of the sexually dimorphic nuclei in the spinal cord corresponding to the expression of male sexual behavior is discussed.

KW - Male sexual function

KW - Neuroanatomy

KW - Sexual dimorphism

KW - Spinal cord

KW - Steroid hormones

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905898128&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905898128&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fnins.2014.00184

DO - 10.3389/fnins.2014.00184

M3 - Article

JO - Frontiers in Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers in Neuroscience

SN - 1662-4548

IS - 8 JUL

M1 - Article 184

ER -