Self-reports of eating quickly are related to a decreased number of chews until first swallow, total number of chews, and total duration of chewing in young people

Daisuke Ekuni, Michiko Furuta, Noriko Takeuchi, Takaaki Tomofuji, Manabu Morita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The validity of a self-questionnaire about eating quickly remains unclear. If a significant relationship between subjective and objective methods to evaluate eating quickly can be confirmed, then the subjective method can be widely and reliably used in many fields. This study investigated relationships between subjective and objective methods to evaluate eating quickly and also numerically characterized the kinesis of eating quickly in young people. Design: One hundred and thirteen students (44 males and 69 females; mean age 22.8 ± 2.0 years) were selected. All subjects completed written questionnaires, and number of chews until first swallow, total duration of chewing, number of chews, chewing rate and bite size were measured using test products (a Japanese cracker and rice ball). Results: Both male and female subjects who reported eating quickly showed a significantly lower number of chews until first swallow (Japanese cracker), a lower number of chews overall (rice ball), and a shorter total duration of chewing (rice ball) than other subjects. There was no difference in chewing rate between subjects who ate quickly or not. Conclusions: These findings suggest that using test products, self-reports of eating quickly are related to a decreased number of chews until first swallow, total number of chews, and total duration of chewing, but not chewing rate, and that a self-reported questionnaire to evaluate eating rate is valid in young people.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)981-986
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Oral Biology
Volume57
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012

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Keywords

  • Chewing
  • Eating quickly
  • Obesity
  • Objective method
  • Subjective method

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Cell Biology
  • Dentistry(all)

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