Selective ablation of basophils in mice reveals their nonredundant role in acquired immunity against ticks

Takeshi Wada, Kenji Ishiwata, Haruhiko Koseki, Tomoyuki Ishikura, Tsukasa Ugajin, Naotsugu Ohnuma, Kazushige Obata, Ryosuke Ishikawa, Soichiro Yoshikawa, Kaori Mukai, Yohei Kawano, Yoshiyuki Minegishi, Hiroo Yokozeki, Naohiro Watanabe, Hajime Karasuyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

173 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ticks are ectoparasitic arthropods that can transmit a variety of microorganisms to humans and animals during blood feeding, causing serious infectious disorders, including Lyme disease. Acaricides are pharmacologic agents that kill ticks. The emergence of acaricide-resistant ticks calls for alternative control strategies for ticks and tick-borne diseases. Many animals develop resistance to ticks after repeated infestations, but the nature of this acquired anti-tick immunity remains poorly understood. Here we investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks in mice and found that antibodies were required, as was IgFc receptor expression on basophils but not on mast cells. The infiltration of basophils at tick-feeding sites occurred during the second, but not the first, tick infestation. To assess the requirement for basophil infiltration to acquired tick resistance, mice expressing the human diphtheria toxin receptor under the control of the mast cell protease 8 (Mcpt8) promoter were generated. Diphtheria toxin administration to these mice selectively ablated basophils. Diphtheria toxin - mediated basophil depletion before the second tick infestation resulted in loss of acquired tick resistance. These data provide the first clear evidence, to our knowledge, that basophils play an essential and nonredundant role in antibody-mediated acquired immunity against ticks, which may suggest new strategies for controlling tick-borne diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2867-2875
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume120
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Basophils
Adaptive Immunity
Ticks
Tick Infestations
Acaricides
Tick-Borne Diseases
Diphtheria Toxin
Mast Cells
Tick Control
Lyme Disease
Arthropods
Antibodies
Immunity
Peptide Hydrolases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Wada, T., Ishiwata, K., Koseki, H., Ishikura, T., Ugajin, T., Ohnuma, N., ... Karasuyama, H. (2010). Selective ablation of basophils in mice reveals their nonredundant role in acquired immunity against ticks. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 120(8), 2867-2875. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI42680

Selective ablation of basophils in mice reveals their nonredundant role in acquired immunity against ticks. / Wada, Takeshi; Ishiwata, Kenji; Koseki, Haruhiko; Ishikura, Tomoyuki; Ugajin, Tsukasa; Ohnuma, Naotsugu; Obata, Kazushige; Ishikawa, Ryosuke; Yoshikawa, Soichiro; Mukai, Kaori; Kawano, Yohei; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Watanabe, Naohiro; Karasuyama, Hajime.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 120, No. 8, 02.08.2010, p. 2867-2875.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wada, T, Ishiwata, K, Koseki, H, Ishikura, T, Ugajin, T, Ohnuma, N, Obata, K, Ishikawa, R, Yoshikawa, S, Mukai, K, Kawano, Y, Minegishi, Y, Yokozeki, H, Watanabe, N & Karasuyama, H 2010, 'Selective ablation of basophils in mice reveals their nonredundant role in acquired immunity against ticks', Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 120, no. 8, pp. 2867-2875. https://doi.org/10.1172/JCI42680
Wada, Takeshi ; Ishiwata, Kenji ; Koseki, Haruhiko ; Ishikura, Tomoyuki ; Ugajin, Tsukasa ; Ohnuma, Naotsugu ; Obata, Kazushige ; Ishikawa, Ryosuke ; Yoshikawa, Soichiro ; Mukai, Kaori ; Kawano, Yohei ; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki ; Yokozeki, Hiroo ; Watanabe, Naohiro ; Karasuyama, Hajime. / Selective ablation of basophils in mice reveals their nonredundant role in acquired immunity against ticks. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 2010 ; Vol. 120, No. 8. pp. 2867-2875.
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