Robustness of climate change signals in near term predictions up to the year 2030: Changes in the frequency of temperature extremes

Hideo Shiogama, Toru Nozawa, Seita Emori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This is the first study to examine whether human contributions to changes in extreme temperature indices have larger amplitudes than natural variability in near future (up to 2030) climate prediction. We performed 10 runs of the initial condition perturbed ensemble of a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. In the near future, over most land areas, all 10 runs predict more frequent occurrences of warm nights and warm days, and less frequent cold nights and cold days, suggesting that human influences have become larger than natural variability. The fraction of areas where all runs agree on the direction of changes over land is less sensitive to ensemble sizes (for warm nights, 96% and 93% for 4 runs and 10 runs, respectively). The changes in the frequency of warm and cold extremes are mainly due to shifts in seasonal mean temperatures. Additionally snow cover affects the frequency of cold extremes in some areas.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberL12714
JournalGeophysical Research Letters
Volume34
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 28 2007
Externally publishedYes

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climate change
night
prediction
predictions
snow cover
temperature
climate
climate prediction
oceans
occurrences
general circulation model
atmospheres
shift
cold
atmosphere
ocean
land

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Robustness of climate change signals in near term predictions up to the year 2030 : Changes in the frequency of temperature extremes. / Shiogama, Hideo; Nozawa, Toru; Emori, Seita.

In: Geophysical Research Letters, Vol. 34, No. 12, L12714, 28.06.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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