Rice dwarf viruses with dysfunctional genomes generated in plants are filtered out in vector insects: Implications for the origin of the virus

Yingying Pu, Akira Kikuchi, Yusuke Moriyasu, Masatoshi Tomaru, Yan Jin, Haruhisa Suga, Kyoji Hagiwara, Fusamichi Akita, Takumi Shimizu, Osamu Netsu, Nobuhiro Suzuki, Tamaki Uehara-Ichiki, Takahide Sasaya, Taiyun Wei, Yi Li, Toshihiro Omura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rice dwarf virus (RDV), with 12 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genome segments (S1 to S12), replicates in and is transmitted by vector insects. The RDV-plant host-vector insect system allows us to examine the evolution, adaptation, and population genetics of a plant virus. We compared the effects of long-term maintenance of RDV on population structures in its two hosts. The maintenance of RDV in rice plants for several years resulted in gradual accumulation of nonsense mutations in S2 and S10, absence of expression of the encoded proteins, and complete loss of transmissibility. RDV maintained in cultured insect cells for 6 years retained an intact protein-encoding genome. Thus, the structural P2 protein encoded by S2 and the nonstructural Pns10 protein encoded by S10 of RDV are subject to different selective pressures in the two hosts, and mutations accumulating in the host plant are detrimental in vector insects. However, one round of propagation in insect cells or individuals purged the populations of RDV that had accumulated deleterious mutations in host plants, with exclusive survival of fully competent RDV. Our results suggest that during the course of evolution, an ancestral form of RDV, of insect virus origin, might have acquired the ability to replicate in a host plant, given its reproducible mutations in the host plant that abolish vector transmissibility and viability in nature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2975-2979
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume85
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

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Rice dwarf virus
Insect Vectors
insect vectors
Genome
Viruses
viruses
genome
host plants
S 10
Plant Viruses
mutation
Mutation
Insects
Proteins
insect viruses
Insect Viruses
nonsense mutation
Oryza
insects
proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

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Rice dwarf viruses with dysfunctional genomes generated in plants are filtered out in vector insects : Implications for the origin of the virus. / Pu, Yingying; Kikuchi, Akira; Moriyasu, Yusuke; Tomaru, Masatoshi; Jin, Yan; Suga, Haruhisa; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Akita, Fusamichi; Shimizu, Takumi; Netsu, Osamu; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki; Sasaya, Takahide; Wei, Taiyun; Li, Yi; Omura, Toshihiro.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 85, No. 6, 03.2011, p. 2975-2979.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pu, Y, Kikuchi, A, Moriyasu, Y, Tomaru, M, Jin, Y, Suga, H, Hagiwara, K, Akita, F, Shimizu, T, Netsu, O, Suzuki, N, Uehara-Ichiki, T, Sasaya, T, Wei, T, Li, Y & Omura, T 2011, 'Rice dwarf viruses with dysfunctional genomes generated in plants are filtered out in vector insects: Implications for the origin of the virus', Journal of Virology, vol. 85, no. 6, pp. 2975-2979. https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02147-10
Pu, Yingying ; Kikuchi, Akira ; Moriyasu, Yusuke ; Tomaru, Masatoshi ; Jin, Yan ; Suga, Haruhisa ; Hagiwara, Kyoji ; Akita, Fusamichi ; Shimizu, Takumi ; Netsu, Osamu ; Suzuki, Nobuhiro ; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki ; Sasaya, Takahide ; Wei, Taiyun ; Li, Yi ; Omura, Toshihiro. / Rice dwarf viruses with dysfunctional genomes generated in plants are filtered out in vector insects : Implications for the origin of the virus. In: Journal of Virology. 2011 ; Vol. 85, No. 6. pp. 2975-2979.
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