Responses to aluminium of suspension-cultured tobacco cells in a simple calcium solution

Hiroshi Ikegawa, Yoko Yamamoto, Hideaki Matsumoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a simple solution containing 3 mM CaCl2 and 3% sucrose (pH 4.5), tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum L.) at the logarithmic phase of growth remained viable at least for 24 h. In this medium, the toxic effect of aluminium (Al) on the plasma membrane was investigated for up to 24 h. After the addition of Al to the cell suspension, Al started to accumulate immediately in the cells, and a maximum value was observed at 9 h. Al induced callose deposition, but did not enhance significantly the uptake of Evans blue (a nonpermeating dye), the peroxidation of lipids and the leakage of potassium (K) ions. Furthermore, the Al-treated cells were stained with fluorescein diacetate (FDA) as much as untreated control cells. These results suggest that the accumulation of Al does not damage the membrane. The addition of Fe(II) to the cells which had been exposed to Al for 12 h resulted in immediate lipid peroxidation and Evans blue uptake several hours later. A combination of Al and Fe(II) caused the K leakage, and enhanced the deposition of callose more than Al alone. These results suggest that the accumulation of Al sensitizes the membrane to the Fe(II)-mediated peroxidation of lipids, and that the Al-enhanced peroxidation of lipids is a direct cause of the loss of integrity of the plasma membrane (or cell death) in the Ca medium.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)503-514
Number of pages12
JournalSoil Science and Plant Nutrition
Volume46
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2000

Fingerprint

tobacco
aluminum
calcium
cells
lipid peroxidation
lipid
membrane
callose
leakage
plasma membrane
plasma
plasma cells
fluorescein
sucrose
Nicotiana tabacum
cell suspension culture
dyes
cell death
dye
potassium

Keywords

  • Aluminium
  • Callose
  • Iron
  • Lipid peroxidation
  • Plasma membrane damage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

Responses to aluminium of suspension-cultured tobacco cells in a simple calcium solution. / Ikegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yoko; Matsumoto, Hideaki.

In: Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Vol. 46, No. 2, 06.2000, p. 503-514.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ikegawa, Hiroshi ; Yamamoto, Yoko ; Matsumoto, Hideaki. / Responses to aluminium of suspension-cultured tobacco cells in a simple calcium solution. In: Soil Science and Plant Nutrition. 2000 ; Vol. 46, No. 2. pp. 503-514.
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