Responses of grain filling in spring wheat and temperate-zone rice to temperature

Similarities and differences

Toru Kobata, Jairo A. Palta, Tomoyuki Tanaka, Masao Ohnishi, Miki Maeda, Müjde KoÇ Cedilla, Celaleddin Barutçular

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.), which belong to the Poaceae family, are starch-grain crops, but wheat is adapted to cooler temperature conditions than rice. In this study, the difference between the two contrasting crops in grain-filling adaptability in response to temperature was investigated. Two spring wheat cultivars were grown in the Mediterranean-type environments of Western Australia and Southeast Turkey, and four temperate-zone rice cultivars were grown in several locations in Japan under irrigated conditions. Portions of the crops were enclosed under a plastic canopy to elevate the temperature after anthesis. Average temperatures during grain filling ranged from 14 to 24 °C for wheat and from 23 to 29 °C for rice. Grain yield varied from 280 to 599 g m−2 in wheat and 354 to 736 g m−2 in rice. When plant density was halved at flowering to estimate the potential grain-filling rate under an increased supply of assimilates, the grain-filling percentages [%F, observed grain weight (G)/potential grain weight (PG)] of both crops were represented by similar logistic curves of cumulative temperatures during the grain filling period. These results suggest that grain-filling responses to temperature scarcely differ between spring wheat and temperate-zone rice. G was estimated for the spring wheat and temperate-zone rice cultivars under different temperatures after anthesis using an assimilate-limited grain-potentiality model consisting of the following parameters: rate of whole-plant weight increase (ΔW/Δt), rate of potential grain dry weight increase (ΔPG/Δt) based on rate of%F (%F/Δt) and PG, and the amount of stem reserves (SP). The observed data showed that the decrease in ΔW/Δt with an increase in temperature in wheat was greater than in rice. According to the model, G started to decrease at lower temperatures in wheat than in rice, and this decrease was accelerated by lower amounts of SP. Therefore, the difference in the optimal temperatures for G during grain filling between the two crops was suggested to mainly result from the sensitivity of assimilation to high temperatures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-199
Number of pages13
JournalField Crops Research
Volume215
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

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filling period
temperate zones
spring wheat
rice
wheat
temperature
cultivar
crop
crops
flowering
starch crops
cultivars
irrigated conditions
starch
cereal
Mediterranean climate
grain crops
starch granules
heat sums
plant density

Keywords

  • Assimilate
  • Grain yield
  • High temperature
  • Optimal temperature
  • Rice
  • Wheat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Soil Science

Cite this

Responses of grain filling in spring wheat and temperate-zone rice to temperature : Similarities and differences. / Kobata, Toru; Palta, Jairo A.; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ohnishi, Masao; Maeda, Miki; KoÇ Cedilla, Müjde; Barutçular, Celaleddin.

In: Field Crops Research, Vol. 215, 01.01.2018, p. 187-199.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kobata, Toru ; Palta, Jairo A. ; Tanaka, Tomoyuki ; Ohnishi, Masao ; Maeda, Miki ; KoÇ Cedilla, Müjde ; Barutçular, Celaleddin. / Responses of grain filling in spring wheat and temperate-zone rice to temperature : Similarities and differences. In: Field Crops Research. 2018 ; Vol. 215. pp. 187-199.
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