Relationship between xerostomia and gingival condition in young adults

S. Mizutani, Daisuke Ekuni, T. Tomofuji, T. Azuma, Kota Kataoka, M. Yamane, Yoshiaki Iwasaki, Manabu Morita

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Objective: Xerostomia is a subjective symptom of dryness in the mouth. Although a correlation between xerostomia and oral conditions in the elderly has been reported, there are few such studies in the young adults. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of xerostomia with the gingival condition in university students. Material and Methods: A total of 2077 students (1202 male subjects and 875 female subjects), 18-24 years of age, were examined. The disease activity and severity of the gingival condition were assessed as the percentage of teeth with bleeding on probing (%BOP) and the presence of teeth with probing pocket depth of ≥ 4 mm, respectively. Additional information on xerostomia, oral health behaviors, coffee/tea intake and nasal congestion was collected via a questionnaire. Path analysis was used to test pathways from xerostomia to the gingival condition. Results: One-hundred and eighty-three (8.8%) students responded that their mouths frequently or always felt dry. Xerostomia was related to %BOP and dental plaque formation, but was not related to the presence of probing pocket depth ≥ 4 mm. In the structural model, xerostomia was related to dental plaque formation (p <0.01), and a lower level of dental plaque formation was associated with a lower %BOP. Xerostomia was associated with coffee/tea intake (p <0.01) and nasal congestion (p <0.001). Conclusion: Xerostomia was indirectly related to gingival disease activity through the accumulation of dental plaque. Nasal congestion and coffee/tea intake also affected xerostomia. These findings suggest that xerostomia should be considered in screening for gingivitis risk in young adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)74-79
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Periodontal Research
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Xerostomia
Young Adult
Dental Plaque
Coffee
Tea
Nose
Students
Tooth
Gingival Diseases
Gingivitis
Structural Models
Health Behavior
Oral Health
Mouth

Keywords

  • Cross-sectional studies
  • Gingival diseases
  • Xerostomia
  • Young adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Periodontics

Cite this

Relationship between xerostomia and gingival condition in young adults. / Mizutani, S.; Ekuni, Daisuke; Tomofuji, T.; Azuma, T.; Kataoka, Kota; Yamane, M.; Iwasaki, Yoshiaki; Morita, Manabu.

In: Journal of Periodontal Research, Vol. 50, No. 1, 01.02.2015, p. 74-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{78b2f93b069144189579b1eb0bcc1c6f,
title = "Relationship between xerostomia and gingival condition in young adults",
abstract = "Background and Objective: Xerostomia is a subjective symptom of dryness in the mouth. Although a correlation between xerostomia and oral conditions in the elderly has been reported, there are few such studies in the young adults. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of xerostomia with the gingival condition in university students. Material and Methods: A total of 2077 students (1202 male subjects and 875 female subjects), 18-24 years of age, were examined. The disease activity and severity of the gingival condition were assessed as the percentage of teeth with bleeding on probing ({\%}BOP) and the presence of teeth with probing pocket depth of ≥ 4 mm, respectively. Additional information on xerostomia, oral health behaviors, coffee/tea intake and nasal congestion was collected via a questionnaire. Path analysis was used to test pathways from xerostomia to the gingival condition. Results: One-hundred and eighty-three (8.8{\%}) students responded that their mouths frequently or always felt dry. Xerostomia was related to {\%}BOP and dental plaque formation, but was not related to the presence of probing pocket depth ≥ 4 mm. In the structural model, xerostomia was related to dental plaque formation (p <0.01), and a lower level of dental plaque formation was associated with a lower {\%}BOP. Xerostomia was associated with coffee/tea intake (p <0.01) and nasal congestion (p <0.001). Conclusion: Xerostomia was indirectly related to gingival disease activity through the accumulation of dental plaque. Nasal congestion and coffee/tea intake also affected xerostomia. These findings suggest that xerostomia should be considered in screening for gingivitis risk in young adults.",
keywords = "Cross-sectional studies, Gingival diseases, Xerostomia, Young adult",
author = "S. Mizutani and Daisuke Ekuni and T. Tomofuji and T. Azuma and Kota Kataoka and M. Yamane and Yoshiaki Iwasaki and Manabu Morita",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jre.12183",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "74--79",
journal = "Journal of Periodontal Research",
issn = "0022-3484",
publisher = "Blackwell Munksgaard",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship between xerostomia and gingival condition in young adults

AU - Mizutani, S.

AU - Ekuni, Daisuke

AU - Tomofuji, T.

AU - Azuma, T.

AU - Kataoka, Kota

AU - Yamane, M.

AU - Iwasaki, Yoshiaki

AU - Morita, Manabu

PY - 2015/2/1

Y1 - 2015/2/1

N2 - Background and Objective: Xerostomia is a subjective symptom of dryness in the mouth. Although a correlation between xerostomia and oral conditions in the elderly has been reported, there are few such studies in the young adults. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of xerostomia with the gingival condition in university students. Material and Methods: A total of 2077 students (1202 male subjects and 875 female subjects), 18-24 years of age, were examined. The disease activity and severity of the gingival condition were assessed as the percentage of teeth with bleeding on probing (%BOP) and the presence of teeth with probing pocket depth of ≥ 4 mm, respectively. Additional information on xerostomia, oral health behaviors, coffee/tea intake and nasal congestion was collected via a questionnaire. Path analysis was used to test pathways from xerostomia to the gingival condition. Results: One-hundred and eighty-three (8.8%) students responded that their mouths frequently or always felt dry. Xerostomia was related to %BOP and dental plaque formation, but was not related to the presence of probing pocket depth ≥ 4 mm. In the structural model, xerostomia was related to dental plaque formation (p <0.01), and a lower level of dental plaque formation was associated with a lower %BOP. Xerostomia was associated with coffee/tea intake (p <0.01) and nasal congestion (p <0.001). Conclusion: Xerostomia was indirectly related to gingival disease activity through the accumulation of dental plaque. Nasal congestion and coffee/tea intake also affected xerostomia. These findings suggest that xerostomia should be considered in screening for gingivitis risk in young adults.

AB - Background and Objective: Xerostomia is a subjective symptom of dryness in the mouth. Although a correlation between xerostomia and oral conditions in the elderly has been reported, there are few such studies in the young adults. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of xerostomia with the gingival condition in university students. Material and Methods: A total of 2077 students (1202 male subjects and 875 female subjects), 18-24 years of age, were examined. The disease activity and severity of the gingival condition were assessed as the percentage of teeth with bleeding on probing (%BOP) and the presence of teeth with probing pocket depth of ≥ 4 mm, respectively. Additional information on xerostomia, oral health behaviors, coffee/tea intake and nasal congestion was collected via a questionnaire. Path analysis was used to test pathways from xerostomia to the gingival condition. Results: One-hundred and eighty-three (8.8%) students responded that their mouths frequently or always felt dry. Xerostomia was related to %BOP and dental plaque formation, but was not related to the presence of probing pocket depth ≥ 4 mm. In the structural model, xerostomia was related to dental plaque formation (p <0.01), and a lower level of dental plaque formation was associated with a lower %BOP. Xerostomia was associated with coffee/tea intake (p <0.01) and nasal congestion (p <0.001). Conclusion: Xerostomia was indirectly related to gingival disease activity through the accumulation of dental plaque. Nasal congestion and coffee/tea intake also affected xerostomia. These findings suggest that xerostomia should be considered in screening for gingivitis risk in young adults.

KW - Cross-sectional studies

KW - Gingival diseases

KW - Xerostomia

KW - Young adult

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84920830107&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84920830107&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jre.12183

DO - 10.1111/jre.12183

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 74

EP - 79

JO - Journal of Periodontal Research

JF - Journal of Periodontal Research

SN - 0022-3484

IS - 1

ER -